Animadvert



to comment unfavorably or critically (usually followed by on or upon):
to animadvert at length upon his faulty use of English.
Obsolete. to take cognizance or notice of.
Historical Examples

In conclusion, let me animadvert upon the injustice with which, to its own loss, society has treated mesmerism.
Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 62, No. 382, October 1847 Various

Nay, what, after all, are the so heinous faults upon which you animadvert?
The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 14, No. 85, November, 1864 Various

It would take up too much time to animadvert upon all the rest of your male and female characters.
Critical Remarks on Sir Charles Grandison, Clarissa, and Pamela (1754) Anonymous

I presumed to animadvert on his eulogy on Garrick, in his Lives of the Poets.
Life of Johnson James Boswell

I find nothing upon which to animadvert till the re-entry of the ghost.
The Mirror of Taste, and Dramatic Censor, Vol. I, No. 4, April 1810 Various

What, then, do British writers mean when they animadvert upon “American spelling?”
Americanisms and Briticisms Brander Matthews

The deficiency in our Treasury has been too notorious to make it necessary for me to animadvert upon that subject.
Abridgment of the Debates of Congress, from 1789 to 1856, Vol. I (of 16) Thomas Hart Benton

If the stage becomes a nursery of folly and impertinence, I shall not be afraid to animadvert upon it.
The Sir Roger de Coverley Papers Various

Nor have I been solicitous to animadvert, as thou wentest along, upon thy inventions, and their tendency.
Clarissa, Volume 3 (of 9) Samuel Richardson

I shall not take upon me to animadvert upon this; but certain it is, that Johnson paid great attention to Taylor.
Life of Johnson James Boswell

verb (intransitive)
usually foll by on or upon. to comment with strong criticism (upon); make censorious remarks (about)
to make an observation or comment
v.

early 15c., “to take notice of,” from Latin animadvertere “to notice, to take cognizance of,” also “to censure, blame, punish,” literally “to turn the mind to” (see animadversion). Sense of “to criticize, blame, censure” in English is from 1660s. Related: Animadverted; animadverting.

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