Antinomy



opposition between one law, principle, rule, etc., and another.
Philosophy. a contradiction between two statements, both apparently obtained by correct reasoning.
Historical Examples

It is even sought to reconcile the antinomy of freedom vs. God’s foreknowledge.
A History of Mediaeval Jewish Philosophy Isaac Husik

Besides, we have already discussed this subject in the antinomy of pure reason.
The Critique of Pure Reason Immanuel Kant

The reasons of this oscillation we shall have occasion to consider in dealing with the fourth antinomy.
A Commentary to Kant’s ‘Critique of Pure Reason’ Norman Kemp Smith

Hence it is exposed to no danger of an antinomy of its own or to a conflict of its principles.
Kant’s Critique of Judgement Immanuel Kant

The antinomy which reveals itself in the application of laws, is for our limited wisdom the best criterion of legislation.
The Critique of Pure Reason Immanuel Kant

This type of argument is, in modern times, called “antinomy.”
A Critical History of Greek Philosophy W. T. Stace

The second antinomy illustrates the dependence of the problem of continuity upon that of infinity.
Our Knowledge of the External World as a Field for Scientific Method in Philosophy Bertrand Russell

Of all the cosmological ideas, however, it is that occasioning the fourth antinomy which compels us to venture upon this step.
The Critique of Pure Reason Immanuel Kant

And with this result we might, if we chose, take leave of the first antinomy.
Our Knowledge of the External World as a Field for Scientific Method in Philosophy Bertrand Russell

The full discussion of this subject will be found in its proper place in the chapter on the antinomy of pure reason.
The Critique of Pure Reason Immanuel Kant

noun (pl) -mies
opposition of one law, principle, or rule to another; contradiction within a law
(philosophy) contradiction existing between two apparently indubitable propositions; paradox
n.

1590s, “contradiction in the laws,” from Latin antinomia, from Greek antinomia “ambiguity in the law,” from anti- “against” (see anti-) + nomos “law” (see numismatics). As a term in logic, from 1802 (Kant).

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