Apperceptive



conscious perception.
the act or process of .
Historical Examples

Somehow “apperceptive masses” are stirred that will assist in getting hold of the new subject.
How We Think John Dewey

Nature, its organization the source of apperceptive forms, 152 et seq.
The Sense of Beauty George Santayana

It is the synthetic, or apperceptive, activity of the mind that gives the “seven-league boots” to genius.
The Measurement of Intelligence Lewis Madison Terman

The “apperceptive mass” is really the “character” or “human nature” of the individual.
The Psychology of Salesmanship William Walker Atkinson

The beauty of landscape, the forms of religion and science, the types of human nature itself, are due to this apperceptive gift.
The Sense of Beauty George Santayana

The apperceptive expectancy, practically nil in the reading of nonsense material, must be decidedly deficient in all poor reading.
The Measurement of Intelligence Lewis Madison Terman

The wide plain, the river hurrying between green banks—no apperceptive background fails thus far in the picture.
Vocal Expression Katherine Jewell Everts

Dewey realizes that his act of intelligence is similar to Kant’s ‘apperceptive unity.’
John Dewey’s logical theory Delton Thomas Howard

It is, in modern terms, an apperceptive basis for all instruction.
Outlines of Educational Doctrine John Frederick Herbart

The first curiosity may be called objective, or sensuous, the second subjective, or apperceptive.
Ontario Normal School Manuals: Science of Education Ontario Ministry of Education

noun (psychol)
the attainment of full awareness of a sensation or idea
the act or process of apperceiving
n.

1753, from French aperception (17c.), from German Apperzeption (or Latin apperceptionem), coined by German mathematician and philosopher Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1646-1716) as noun corresponding to French apercevoir “perceive, notice, become aware of” (11c., from Latin ad “to” (see ad-) + percipere; see perceive) on analogy of Perzeption/percevoir.

apperception ap·per·cep·tion (āp’ər-sěp’shən)
n.

Conscious perception with full awareness. Also called comprehension.

The process of understanding by which newly observed qualities of an object are related to past experience.

ap’per·cep’tive (-sěp’tĭv) adj.

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