Apropos



fitting; at the right time; to the purpose; opportunely.
Obsolete. by the way.
opportune; pertinent:
apropos remarks.
apropos of, with reference to; in respect or regard to:
apropos of the preceding statement.
Contemporary Examples

apropos inflation, the government could try to inflate its way out of this crisis, covering the deficit by printing money.
Fischer King Departs Bernard Avishai January 30, 2013

There’s a marvelous letter he wrote to Shaw about censorship that is very funny and apropos.
Brian Bedford Interviewed on The Importance of Being Earnest Kevin Sessums January 21, 2011

He said, apropos of nothing, “The punchline was: And I realized I was smelling my balls.”
Dave Chappelle’s Secret Shows Touré July 9, 2011

apropos of general indieness, the show paused for a mini-concert from My Morning Jacket.
‘The Artist’ Sweeps at Independent Spirit Awards Richard Rushfield February 25, 2012

She also mentioned, apropos of nothing, the line in the song about wives attacking on Twitter.
The Real Housewives of New York City’s Alex McCord Lets Loose Nicole LaPorte May 24, 2011

Historical Examples

“It certainly is warm,” observed Lefever, apropos of nothing at all.
Nan of Music Mountain Frank H. Spearman

apropos, Belinda, did not you tell me Clarence Hervey is coming to town?
Tales And Novels, Volume 3 (of 10) Maria Edgeworth

apropos of the value of simile is an experiment about which I have recently heard.
Happiness as Found in Forethought Minus Fearthought Horace Fletcher

apropos, what is the reason that we have seen so little of Clarence Hervey lately?
Tales And Novels, Volume 3 (of 10) Maria Edgeworth

apropos of Salamanca, there was a little jeu d’esprit worth preserving.
Social England under the Regency, Vol. 1 (of 2) John Ashton.

adjective
appropriate; pertinent
adverb
appropriately or pertinently
by the way; incidentally
(preposition) apropos of, with regard to; in respect of
adv.

1660s, “opportunely,” from French à propos “to the purpose,” from propos “thing said in conversation, talk; purpose, plan,” from Latin propositium “purpose,” past participle of proponere “to set forth, propose” (see propound). Meaning “as regards” is 1761, from French. As an adjective, “to the point or purpose,” from 1690s.

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    fitting; at the right time; to the purpose; opportunely. Obsolete. by the way. opportune; pertinent: apropos remarks. apropos of, with reference to; in respect or regard to: apropos of the preceding statement. adjective appropriate; pertinent adverb appropriately or pertinently by the way; incidentally (preposition) apropos of, with regard to; in respect of adv. 1660s, “opportunely,” […]

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    not containing dissociable hydrogen. adjective (chem) (of solvents) neither accepting nor donating hydrogen ions

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