Ardor



great warmth of feeling; fervor; passion:
She spoke persuasively and with ardor.
intense devotion, eagerness, or enthusiasm; zeal:
his well-known ardor for Chinese art.
burning heat.
Contemporary Examples

I wish that the ardor for information on our jobs initiative would be as strong as it is on this other subject.
What’s Next for Weiner? Jill Lawrence June 16, 2011

Though they look like little potsers and nudniks—wise men of Chelm—they are made vibrant by the ardor of their claims.
Smoked Fish Surrealism: Ben Katchor’s Comics of NYC Neurotics Jacob Siegel March 15, 2013

Peter Beinart on why liberals’ ardor has cooled—but Obama is headed for a predictable victory anyway.
Why Obama’s Campaign Bores Me Peter Beinart April 4, 2011

That may reduce the ardor of the GOP base at primary time, should McChrystal be so inclined to run.
Big Shots Offer Career Advice for McChrystal Samuel P. Jacobs, Lloyd Grove June 29, 2010

Primary voters have two qualities by which they operate: ardor and calculation.
The GOP’s Post-Palin Comedown Michael Tomasky October 5, 2011

Historical Examples

Joyce, I reflected, mundanely, had clearly swept her off her feet in the ardor of their first meeting and instant love.
The Best Short Stories of 1920 Various

The ardor of Mr. Gladstone’s feelings on this subject is notorious.
The Grand Old Man Richard B. Cook

Such was her ardor and enthusiasm that she sang in the winter of 1874-5 no less than one hundred and twenty-five times.
Famous Singers of To-day and Yesterday Henry C. Lahee

Man-like, hot with the ardor of the chase, he was deaf and blind to all else.
The Black Bag Louis Joseph Vance

It is wonderful how quickly one’s ardor disappears, when, from being the hunter, he becomes the hunted.
Buffalo Land W. E. Webb

n.

early 15c., “heat of passion or desire,” from Old French ardure “heat, glow; passion” (12c.), from Latin ardorem (nominative ardor) “a flame, fire, burning, heat;” also of feelings, etc., “eagerness, zeal,” from ardere “to burn” (see ardent). In Middle English, used of base passions; since Milton’s time, of noble ones.

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  • Ardour

    great warmth of feeling; fervor; passion: She spoke persuasively and with ardor. intense devotion, eagerness, or enthusiasm; zeal: his well-known ardor for Chinese art. burning heat. Contemporary Examples But Jack Scott came in and entered into the “game,” as he called it, with ardour. Read ‘The King in Yellow,’ the ‘True Detective’ Reference That’s the […]

  • Ards

    adult respiratory distress syndrome. See (def 2). Historical Examples How many evenin’s I’ve seen her set by it, rockin’ back’ARDS an’ for’ARDS,—an’ her needle goin’ in an’ out! Meadow Grass Alice Brown Their in’ARDS have not learned how to suspend the law of gravity. The Letters of Ambrose Bierce Ambrose Bierce Person turn de wheel […]



  • Arduously

    requiring great exertion; laborious; difficult: an arduous undertaking. requiring or using much energy and vigor; strenuous: making an arduous effort. hard to climb; steep: an arduous path up the hill. hard to endure; full of hardships; severe: an arduous winter. Historical Examples It was as if every morning that ship had been arduously explored with—with […]

  • Arduousness

    requiring great exertion; laborious; difficult: an arduous undertaking. requiring or using much energy and vigor; strenuous: making an arduous effort. hard to climb; steep: an arduous path up the hill. hard to endure; full of hardships; severe: an arduous winter. Historical Examples They vary in arduousness: all would be marked “heavy work” in a job […]



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