Ardour



great warmth of feeling; fervor; passion:
She spoke persuasively and with ardor.
intense devotion, eagerness, or enthusiasm; zeal:
his well-known ardor for Chinese art.
burning heat.
Contemporary Examples

But Jack Scott came in and entered into the “game,” as he called it, with ardour.
Read ‘The King in Yellow,’ the ‘True Detective’ Reference That’s the Key to the Show Robert W. Chambers February 19, 2014

Historical Examples

In the ardour of the chase the dogs soon ran out of sight, pursuing their quarry towards the shore at Sligachan.
The Celtic Magazine, Vol. I, No. VI, April 1886 Various

Imogen, you are too beautiful—I have beheld you too long—I have admired you with too fierce an ardour.
Imogen William Godwin

She had loved Sir Alexander with all the ardour of a first youthful attachment.
The Monctons: A Novel, Volume I Susanna Moodie

“Yourself,” he whispered, with an ardour that almost amounted to fierceness.
The Trampling of the Lilies Rafael Sabatini

Gurney applied his steam-jet to other purposes than propelling locomotives and exciting the ardour of furnaces in ironworks.
Cornish Characters S. Baring-Gould

Xenophon, mounted on his charger, rode beside his men, and roused their ardour the while.
Anabasis Xenophon

For all that I accomplished during this day, I believe myself indebted to the strenuousness and ardour of my resolutions.
Arthur Mervyn Charles Brockden Brown

The party of intervention, however, was still active and full of ardour.
England and Germany Emile Joseph Dillon

At a subsequent period he devoted himself with ardour to his improvement in general knowledge.
The Modern Scottish Minstrel, Volume IV. Various

noun
feelings of great intensity and warmth; fervour
eagerness; zeal
n.

chiefly British English spelling of ardor (q.v.); for spelling, see -or.
n.

early 15c., “heat of passion or desire,” from Old French ardure “heat, glow; passion” (12c.), from Latin ardorem (nominative ardor) “a flame, fire, burning, heat;” also of feelings, etc., “eagerness, zeal,” from ardere “to burn” (see ardent). In Middle English, used of base passions; since Milton’s time, of noble ones.

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  • Arduously

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    requiring great exertion; laborious; difficult: an arduous undertaking. requiring or using much energy and vigor; strenuous: making an arduous effort. hard to climb; steep: an arduous path up the hill. hard to endure; full of hardships; severe: an arduous winter. Contemporary Examples His successors will face the arduous task of fleshing out the content of […]



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