to get up from sitting, lying, or kneeling; rise:
He arose from his chair when she entered the room.
to awaken; wake up:
He arose at sunrise to get an early start to the beach.
to move upward; mount; ascend:
A thin curl of smoke arose lazily from the cabin.
to come into being, action, or notice; originate; appear; spring up:
New problems arise daily.
to result or proceed; spring or issue (sometimes followed by from):
It is difficult to foresee the consequences that may arise from this action. After such destruction many problems in resettlement often arise.
Contemporary Examples

The problem of “incidental impact” arises in many different contexts.
Waiting for the Supreme Court on the Hobby Lobby Decision Geoffrey R. Stone June 17, 2014

For every “potential Ebola victim” that arises in the U.S., the CDC is forced to mobilize to the location.
Ebola Panic Is Worse Than the Disease Abby Haglage October 8, 2014

Historical Examples

And the last word must meet an anxiety that arises out of this very confidence.
The Story of Evolution Joseph McCabe

The instant he appears there arises a cheer—the mightiest of any yet.
The Fifth Form at Saint Dominic’s Talbot Baines Reed

But his imagination is moved, and there arises a new strain altogether.
Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine, Vol. 66, No 405, July 1849 Various

You will be prepared to testify to that effect in case the need ever arises.
Blow The Man Down Holman Day

Ornamentation, when it does begin to appear, arises at first in a strictly practical and unintentional manner.
Falling in Love Grant Allen

This arises from its bulkier shape, caused by its thick fleece of long wool.
The Forest Exiles Mayne Reid

Much perplexity in the marriage state often arises from want of candor.
Martine’s Hand-book of Etiquette, and Guide to True Politeness Arthur Martine

This arises from the peculiar geological structure of these mountains.
The Forest Exiles Mayne Reid

verb (intransitive) arises, arising, arose, arisen
to come into being; originate
(foll by from) to spring or proceed as a consequence; result: guilt arising from my actions
to get or stand up, as from a sitting, kneeling, or lying position
to come into notice
to move upwards; ascend

Old English arisan “to get up, rise; spring from, originate; spring up, ascend” (cognate with Old Saxon arisan, Gothic urreisan), from a- (1) “of” + rise (v.). Mostly replaced by rise except in reference to circumstances. Related: Arising; arose; arisen.


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