Arminian



the doctrinal teachings of Jacobus Arminius or his followers, especially the doctrine that Christ died for all people and not only for the elect.
Compare (def 1).
Historical Examples

They proceeded to condemn the arminian doctrines, and to banish all the preachers who upheld them.
Curiosities of Human Nature Anonymous

He has an excellent humour for an heretick, and in these days made the first arminian.
Microcosmography John Earle

The arminian dispute led by necessary consequence to the question of public toleration.
Introduction to the Literature of Europe in the Fifteenth, Sixteenth, and Seventeenth Centuries, Vol. 2 Henry Hallam

A soldier said he would get a gimlet and bore a hole into the arminian.
The Life of John of Barneveld, 1614-23, Volume II. John Lothrop Motley

The Arian heresy did not necessarily follow the arminian, but much the same causes led to its appearance.
Unitarianism in America George Willis Cooke

Whitefield was a Calvinist: I am an arminian; but the book is not controversial.
The Life of the Rev. George Whitefield, Volume I (of 2) Luke Tyerman

My mother grieves, that one of her sons is an Arian, another an arminian.
Benjamin Franklin Frank Luther Mott

They are arminian books, and those are mighty solid, I can tell you.
True Stories of Girl Heroines Evelyn Everett-Green

One of the most prominent of his reasons was, that the Church of Ireland connived “at arminian doctrines.”
The Life of the Rev. George Whitefield, Volume I (of 2) Luke Tyerman

The ecclesiastical policy of the church is Wesleyan; but its theology is arminian.
Cox–The Man Roger W. Babson

adjective
denoting, relating to, or believing in the Christian Protestant doctrines of Jacobus Arminius, published in 1610, which rejected absolute predestination and insisted that the sovereignty of God is compatible with free will in man. These doctrines deeply influenced Wesleyan and Methodist theology
noun
a follower of such doctrines

1610s, from Arminius, Latinized form of the name of James Harmensen (1560-1609), Dutch Protestant theologian who opposed Calvin, especially on the question of predestination. His ideas were denounced at the Synod of Dort, but nonetheless spread in the Reformed churches.

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  • Arminianism

    the doctrinal teachings of Jacobus Arminius or his followers, especially the doctrine that Christ died for all people and not only for the elect. Compare (def 1). Historical Examples I mean in contradiction to Arminianism, and all the isms that were ever broached in this world of ignorance and error. The World’s Greatest Books, Vol […]

  • Arminius

    (Hermann) 17? b.c.–a.d. 21, Germanic hero who defeated Roman army a.d. 9. Jacobus [juh-koh-buh s] /dʒəˈkoʊ bəs/ (Show IPA), (Jacob Harmensen) 1560–1609, Dutch Protestant theologian. noun Also Hermann. ?17 bc–?21 ad, Germanic chieftain: organized a revolt against the Romans in 9 a.d Jacobus. (dʒəˈkəʊbəs), real name Jacob Harmensen. 1560–1609, Dutch Protestant theologian



  • Armipotent

    strong in battle. Historical Examples In this character Armado is made to use the peculiar word “armipotent” twice. Shakespeare’s Lost Years in London, 1586-1592 Arthur Acheson Parolles is referred to as “the manifold linguist and armipotent soldier.” Shakespeare’s Lost Years in London, 1586-1592 Arthur Acheson adjective (literary) strong in arms or war

  • Virtute et armis

    by virtue and arms: motto of Mississippi.



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