Armistice



a temporary suspension of hostilities by agreement of the warring parties; truce:
World War I ended with the armistice of 1918.
Contemporary Examples

armistice lines (and more occupied territories) are still the de facto barriers between Israel and Lebanon and Syria.
Yousef Munayyer Responds to His Critics Yousef Munayyer March 29, 2012

The borders of Israel between 1949 and 1967, created by armistice agreements, were even less acceptable to the party.
Draw the Line: How Israel Erases Itself Gershom Gorenberg March 25, 2012

He further proclaimed that the 1949 armistice lines “between us and Egypt are vanished and dead.”
Time to Talk Tough With Israel Kai Bird March 21, 2010

The armistice lines—Israel’s pre-1967 borders—were only de facto, not de jure, boundaries.
Israel Needs a Palestinian State Gershom Gorenberg September 18, 2011

The fighting had stopped with nothing more solid than an armistice.
Between Two Catastrophes: Look at Syria, and Question Everyone’s Stories about 1948 Gershom Gorenberg September 22, 2013

Historical Examples

The English asked fifteen days’ armistice to consider the proposal in.
Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc Mark Twain

On the 9th, Nelson landed again, to conclude the terms of the armistice.
The Life of Horatio Lord Nelson Robert Southey

The armistice to bury the dead expired on the 13th, and a Boer commando had been sighted to the west.
With Methuen’s Column on an Ambulance Train Ernest N. Bennett

A difficulty arose respecting the duration of the armistice.
The Life of Horatio Lord Nelson Robert Southey

There was no unpleasant possibility of having to make common cause and proclaim an armistice.
The Fifth Form at Saint Dominic’s Talbot Baines Reed

noun
an agreement between opposing armies to suspend hostilities in order to discuss peace terms; truce
n.

1707, from French armistice (1680s), coined on the model of Latin solstitium (see solstice), etc., from Latin arma “arms” (see arm (n.2)) + -stitium (used only in compounds), from sistere “cause to stand” (see assist).

The word is attested in English from 1660s in the Latin form armistitium. German Waffenstillstand is a loan-translation from French. Armistice Day (1919) marked the end of the Great War of 1914-18 on Nov. 11, 1918. In Britain, after World War II, it merged with Remembrance Day. In U.S., Armistice Day became a national holiday in 1926. In 1954, to honor World War II and Korean War veterans as well, it was re-dubbed Veterans Day.

Tagged:

Read Also:

  • Armistice day

    former name of . Historical Examples Nothing of the sort, however, could be unearthed by the most diligent search until the Armistice Day of 1963. The Brain Alexander Blade It was a part of the Armistice Day fervor, but I believed it. The Log-Cabin Lady, An Anonymous Autobiography Unknown noun the anniversary of the signing […]

  • Armistices

    a temporary suspension of hostilities by agreement of the warring parties; truce: World War I ended with the armistice of 1918. Historical Examples We can only during the night, when there are armistices, go forth with the lantern on the field of death to bury the dead. The Prose Writings of Heinrich Heine Heinrich Heine […]



  • Armen.

    .

  • Armless

    lacking an or : The Venus de Milo is an armless statue. Contemporary Examples All that was left of the corpse was a headless, armless torso with one leg, still wearing a stiletto-heeled boot. Headless Torso Found in Venice Lagoon Barbie Latza Nadeau June 1, 2013 Historical Examples I didn’t think as ‘ow even ‘Enery […]



Disclaimer: Armistice definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.