Arroba



a Spanish and Portuguese unit of weight of varying value, equal to 25.37 pounds avoirdupois (9.5 kilograms) in Mexico and to 32.38 pounds avoirdupois (12 kilograms) in Brazil.
a unit of liquid measure of varying value, used especially in Spain and commonly equal (when used for wine) to 4.26 U.S. gallons (16.1 liters).
Historical Examples

Let his diligence when he preaches be not long, but fervid; for one onza of gold is worth more than an arroba of straw.
The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898 (Vol 28 of 55) Various

A measure for liquids, the eighth of an arroba, equal to about half a gallon.
The Bible in Spain – Vol. 2 [of 2] George Borrow

By-and-by he extracted a spade, a mattock, and a skin-covered corn measure holding about the quarter of an arroba.
The Firebrand S. R. Crockett

They are three days taking it, eating nothing in the time, and daily each one drinks an arroba and a half.
Original Narratives of Early American History Vaca and Others

An order exists, that beef is not to be sold at more than three reals the arroba, at market.
A Five Years’ Residence in Buenos Ayres George Thomas Love

A strong man will carry an arroba and a half daily for a distance of six leagues for a whole week.
The Former Philippines thru Foreign Eyes Toms de Comyn

To both classes is given one arroba of Castilian wine, and flour for the mass.
The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898: Volume XXII, 1625-29 Various

Beef is sold at three reals the arroba, or 25 lb.; mutton, for the whole sheep, six reals.
A Five Years’ Residence in Buenos Ayres George Thomas Love

The price in Nauta is two dollars the arroba, and in Europe from forty to sixty dollars.
Oregon and Eldorado Thomas Bulfinch

These are gathered, and tied up in bundles of about an arroba, or thirty-two pounds’ weight.
Oregon and Eldorado Thomas Bulfinch

noun (pl) -bas
a unit of weight, approximately equal to 11 kilograms, used in some Spanish-speaking countries
a unit of weight, approximately equal to 15 kilograms, used in some Portuguese-speaking countries
a liquid measure used in some Spanish-speaking countries with different values, but in Spain used as a wine-measure, approximately equal to 16 litres

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