Athleticism



physically active and strong; good at or sports:
an athletic child.
of, like, or befitting an .
of or relating to ; involving the use of physical skills or capabilities, as strength, agility, or stamina:
athletic sports; athletic training.
for :
an athletic field.
Psychology. (of a physical type) having a sturdy build or well-proportioned body structure.
Compare (def 2), (def 1).
Contemporary Examples

Or the receiver leaping in gyration to catch a poorly thrown ball that defies all bounds of athleticism.
NFL Playoffs: Why Football Needs Violence Buzz Bissinger January 17, 2011

Among the giants of fantasy, athleticism, and history, is there any room for the every day hero?
The Legend of Brown Dog: A Great American Hero Gets His Due David Masciotra December 6, 2013

The athleticism is astounding, and the kids’ dedication–obsession?
What to Watch on TV This Week Nicole Ankowski December 6, 2008

He considers the beauty of athleticism and wonders if it is proof of the existence of some divinity.
David Foster Wallace, Traditionalist? Considering ‘Both Flesh and Not: Essays’ David Masciotra November 1, 2012

But he was not athletic, at a time and a place when athleticism among young men was the coin of the realm.
Paul Begala on Romney: Once a Bully, Always a Bully Paul Begala May 10, 2012

Historical Examples

Fishing was Gus’s ideal of athleticism; the exercise was gentle, and you sometimes had half a dozen perch for your trouble.
Acton’s Feud Frederick Swainson

athleticism is as jealous an accomplishment as any art you would acquire.
Three Hundred Things a Bright Boy Can Do Anonymous

Nineteenth-century master launches an attack on out-moded Scottish marital laws and Victorian cult of athleticism.
Life Histories of North American Wood Warblers Part One and Part Two Arthur Bent

athleticism takes up time and cripples a man in his competitive examinations, and in business.
Certain Personal Matters H. G. Wells

athleticism in England is an asceticism, as much as the monastic rules.
Twelve Types G.K. Chesterton

adjective
physically fit or strong; muscular or active
of, relating to, or suitable for an athlete or for athletics
of or relating to a person with a muscular and well-proportioned body See also somatotype
n.

1835, from athletic + -ism.
adj.

1630s (athletical is from 1590s), “pertaining to an athlete,” from Latin athleticus, from Greek athletikos, from athletes (see athlete). Meaning “strong of body; vigorous; lusty; robust” [Johnson, who spells it athletick] is from 1650s.

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  • Athletics

    (usually used with a plural verb) sports, as running, rowing, or boxing. British. track-and-field events. (usually used with a singular verb) the practice of exercises; the principles of training. Contemporary Examples Certain forms of talent we easily respect: talent at athletics, talent for entertainment. I Was Adam Lanza, Part 3 David Frum December 22, 2012 […]

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  • Fugard

    Athol (Harold) born 1932, South African playwright and actor. noun Athol (ˈæθəl). born 1932, South African dramatist and theatre director. His plays include The Blood-Knot (1961), Sizwe Bansi is Dead (1972), Statements after an Arrest under the Immorality Act (1974), and The Captain’s Tiger (1999)

  • Athol

    a city in central Massachusetts. a male given name. Historical Examples The scene of uproar, noise, and confusion on board the Athol is far above my ability to convey. Harper’s New Monthly Magazine, Vol. 3, July, 1851 Various Though wild as ony Athol deer,She has trepann’d me fairly, O! The Book of Humorous Verse Various […]



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