Atoned



to make amends or reparation, as for an offense or a crime, or for an offender (usually followed by for):
to atone for one’s sins.
to make up, as for errors or deficiencies (usually followed by for):
to atone for one’s failings.
Obsolete. to become reconciled; agree.
to make amends for; expiate:
He atoned his sins.
Obsolete. to bring into unity, harmony, concord, etc.
Contemporary Examples

Andrew Sullivan, for my money, has atoned in ways Hitchens never did (and Kelly never had the chance to).
Michael Kelly and the War Michael Tomasky April 3, 2013

More recently, he and his wife, Lynne, have atoned for their tight-fistedness.
The Stingiest Politicians The Daily Beast April 15, 2010

Historical Examples

The fortune of war is changeable, but a disaster may be atoned for.
The Works of Theophile Gautier, Volume 5 Theophile Gautier

She had atoned for everything, by the sacrifice she had made of her life.
The Picture of Dorian Gray Oscar Wilde

However, the man was atoned for by three extremely beautiful and graceful young girls who followed him.
The Roll-Call Arnold Bennett

The insult must be atoned for by presents, or be washed out with blood.
The Prairie Traveler Randolph Marcy

The banquet proceeded in very hearty fashion, which atoned for its roughness.
The Last of the Vikings John Bowling

Have those young sots and pimps yet atoned for their foul impieties?’
Aurelian William Ware

The emphasis here is not so much upon sin to be atoned for or punishment to be avoided, as reconciliation to be achieved.
Modern Religious Cults and Movements Gaius Glenn Atkins

Surely that sin has been atoned for; I have suffered for it as no tongue can tell.
St. Cuthbert’s Robert E. Knowles

verb
(intransitive) foll by for. to make amends or reparation (for a crime, sin, etc)
(transitive) to expiate: to atone a guilt with repentance
(obsolete) to be in or bring into agreement
v.

1550s, from adverbial phrase atonen (c.1300) “in accord,” literally “at one,” a contraction of at and one. It retains the older pronunciation of one. The phrase perhaps is modeled on Latin adunare “unite,” from ad- “to, at” (see ad-) + unum “one.” Related: Atoned; atoning.

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  • Atonement

    satisfaction or reparation for a wrong or injury; amends. (sometimes initial capital letter) Theology. the doctrine concerning the reconciliation of God and humankind, especially as accomplished through the life, suffering, and death of Christ. Christian Science. the experience of humankind’s unity with God exemplified by Jesus Christ. Archaic. reconciliation; agreement. noun satisfaction, reparation, or expiation […]

  • Atonement, day of

    atonement, day of the great annual day of humiliation and expiation for the sins of the nation, “the fast” (Acts 27:9), and the only one commanded in the law of Moses. The mode of its observance is described in Lev. 16:3-10; 23:26-32; and Num. 29:7-11. It was kept on the tenth day of the month […]



  • Atoner

    to make amends or reparation, as for an offense or a crime, or for an offender (usually followed by for): to atone for one’s sins. to make up, as for errors or deficiencies (usually followed by for): to atone for one’s failings. Obsolete. to become reconciled; agree. to make amends for; expiate: He atoned his […]

  • Atones

    to make amends or reparation, as for an offense or a crime, or for an offender (usually followed by for): to atone for one’s sins. to make up, as for errors or deficiencies (usually followed by for): to atone for one’s failings. Obsolete. to become reconciled; agree. to make amends for; expiate: He atoned his […]



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