Atrophies



Also, atrophia
[uh-troh-fee-uh] /əˈtroʊ fi ə/ (Show IPA). Pathology. a wasting away of the body or of an organ or part, as from defective nutrition or nerve damage.
degeneration, decline, or decrease, as from disuse:
He argued that there was a progressive atrophy of freedom and independence of thought.
to affect with or undergo atrophy.
Historical Examples

It is more developed in Scyllium than in Raja, but atrophies early in both genera.
The Works of Francis Maitland Balfour, Volume 1 Francis Maitland Balfour

Whichever faculty you use, the other atrophies, and partly deserts you.
This Simian World Clarence Day

Even when absorbed into the tissues in minute doses it corrodes the brain and atrophies the intellect.
The Bartlett Mystery Louis Tracy

Many of these atrophies from disuse are cured by mental influence of one kind or another.
Psychotherapy James J. Walsh

If it yields to their narcotic charms, the best brain grows rusty and atrophies in the long run.
Battle Studies Charles-Jean-Jacques-Joseph Ardant du Picq

In Torpedo embryos the head-cavity is much smaller, and atrophies earlier than in the embryos of Pristiurus and Scyllium.
The Works of Francis Maitland Balfour, Volume 1 Francis Maitland Balfour

This atrophies if the main mass is removed, and the fossa of Rosenmller can be cleared out with the forefinger.
A System of Operative Surgery, Volume IV (of 4) Various

It becomes in fact the oviduct in the female and atrophies in the male.
The Works of Francis Maitland Balfour, Volume 1 Francis Maitland Balfour

noun (pl) -phies
a wasting away of an organ or part, or a failure to grow to normal size as the result of disease, faulty nutrition, etc
any degeneration or diminution, esp through lack of use
verb -phies, -phying, -phied
to waste away or cause to waste away
n.

“a wasting away through lack of nourishment,” 1620s (atrophied is from 1590s), from French atrophie, from Late Latin atrophia, from Greek atrophia “a wasting away,” noun of state from atrophos “ill-fed, un-nourished,” from a- “not” + trophe “nourishment,” from trephein “to fatten” (see -trophy).
v.

1822 (implied in atrophied), from atrophy (n.). Related: Atrophying.

atrophy at·ro·phy (āt’rə-fē)
n.
A wasting or decrease in the size of an organ or tissue, as from death and reabsorption of cells, diminished cellular proliferation, pressure, ischemia, malnutrition, decreased function, or hormonal changes. Also called atrophia. v. at·ro·phied, at·ro·phy·ing, at·ro·phies
To undergo atrophy.
a·troph’ic (ā-trŏf’ĭk) adj.
atrophy
(āt’rə-fē)
A wasting or decrease in the size of an organ or tissue, as from death and reabsorption of cells, diminished proliferation of cells, pressure, lack of oxygen, malnutrition, decreased function, or hormonal changes.
atrophy [(at-ruh-fee)]

The wasting away or decrease in size of an organ or tissue in the body. When a body part is affected by paralysis, the muscles may atrophy through lack of use.

Note: The term is also used in a more general way to refer to a wasting process: “Since he stopped playing, his piano skills have atrophied.”

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  • Atrophying

    Also, atrophia [uh-troh-fee-uh] /əˈtroʊ fi ə/ (Show IPA). Pathology. a wasting away of the body or of an organ or part, as from defective nutrition or nerve damage. degeneration, decline, or decrease, as from disuse: He argued that there was a progressive atrophy of freedom and independence of thought. to affect with or undergo atrophy. […]

  • Atropine

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