Attires



to dress, array, or adorn, especially for special occasions, ceremonials, etc.
clothes or apparel, especially rich or splendid garments.
the horns of a deer.
Historical Examples

There is no genuine feeling in it: he attires himself in tawdry sentiment as in a flowered waistcoat.
Library Of The World’s Best Literature, Ancient And Modern, Vol 6 Various

Denise attires her young mistress, who looks really pale after this enforced seclusion.
Floyd Grandon’s Honor Amanda Minnie Douglas

To the outer glozing fame That now attires us splendent, we may add Inmost applause.
The Mortal Gods and Other Plays Olive Tilford Dargan

One of the women brings forward a number of attires of false hair, golden and red, and from these the Queen chooses one.
English Costume Dion Clayton Calthrop

Their attires were iridescent, gorgeous in the fashions borrowed from many lands.
The Hill of Venus Nathan Gallizier

She attires herself splendidly; he swings her on to his horse behind him, and they ride to a wood.
The English and Scottish Popular Ballads (Volume I of 5) Various

In his inventory of dresses and properties, bearing date 1598, is included a record of “six head tiers,” or attires.
A Book of the Play Dutton Cook

Magdalen attires herself with the utmost splendor, and, to hear the sermon better, takes a place immediately under the pulpit.
The English and Scottish Popular Ballads (Volume I of 5) Various

She then calls for her diadem, her robes of state, and attires herself as if “again for Cydnus, to meet Mark Antony.”
Characteristics of Women Anna Jameson

She attires herself in silk, with a gold crown on her hair, and he swings her on to his horse.
The English and Scottish Popular Ballads (Volume I of 5) Various

verb
(transitive) to dress, esp in fine elegant clothes; array
noun
clothes or garments, esp if fine or decorative
the antlers of a mature male deer
v.

c.1300, “to fit out, equip; to dress in finery, to adorn,” from Old French atirier “to equip, ready, prepare,” from a- “to” + tire “order, row, dress” (see tier). Related: Attired; attiring.
n.

c.1300, “equipment of a man-at-arms; fine apparel,” from attire (v.).

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