extremely bold or daring; recklessly brave; fearless:
an audacious explorer.
extremely original; without restriction to prior ideas; highly inventive:
an audacious vision of the city’s bright future.
recklessly bold in defiance of convention, propriety, law, or the like; insolent; brazen.
lively; unrestrained; uninhibited:
an audacious interpretation of her role.
Contemporary Examples

Christie was quick to respond with a statement that began with a line that was audacious even by Jersey standards.
David Wildstein: A Christie Groupie Scorned? Michael Daly January 31, 2014

Yet such a move would almost certainly be widely seen as an audacious display of ingratitude.
AIG May Sue the Government For An Insufficiently Generous Bailout Megan McArdle January 7, 2013

Up from History offers an audacious revision of Washington’s reputation.
David’s Book Club: Up From History David Frum February 1, 2013

The former prime minister wants to lead Italy again and is pandering in an ugly, audacious way.
The ‘Unbreakable’ Silvio Berlusconi Barbie Latza Nadeau January 30, 2013

Two years ago, Haddad made “happen” Jasad, an audacious magazine in the Middle East devoted exclusively to the body.
Nude Art Mag Riles Middle East Betwa Sharma September 2, 2010

Historical Examples

His black eyes were of the audacious sort, and he flashed a glance of admiration at Patty.
Patty’s Social Season Carolyn Wells

There was no audacious bobcat around to worry them that night.
With Trapper Jim in the North Woods Lawrence J. Leslie

What such an audacious look of well-being, under august displeasure, could mean she could not understand.
A Little Princess Frances Hodgson Burnett

She was an audacious woman, and openly looked compassionately at me.
Little Dorrit Charles Dickens

Still the plan, considering the Boers’ skill in defending strong positions, had an audacious look about it.
With Rimington L. March Phillipps

recklessly bold or daring; fearless
impudent or presumptuous

1540s, “confident, intrepid,” from Middle French audacieux, from audace “boldness,” from Latin audacia “daring, boldness, courage,” from audax “brave, bold, daring,” but more often “bold” in a bad sense, “audacious, rash, foolhardy,” from audere “to dare, be bold.” Bad sense of “shameless” is attested from 1590s in English. Related: Audaciously.


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