Audaciously



extremely bold or daring; recklessly brave; fearless:
an audacious explorer.
extremely original; without restriction to prior ideas; highly inventive:
an audacious vision of the city’s bright future.
recklessly bold in defiance of convention, propriety, law, or the like; insolent; brazen.
lively; unrestrained; uninhibited:
an audacious interpretation of her role.
Contemporary Examples

Most audaciously, given what the technology does, Google claims it encourages us to “explore the world around you.”
Google Glass’s Insane, Terrifying Etiquette Guide Tim Teeman February 19, 2014

Historical Examples

His royal pride was further humbled: with my lacerated hands, I audaciously forced open his jaws.
Autobiography of a YOGI Paramhansa Yogananda

“No doubt there are a few,” returned Christopher audaciously.
Christopher and the Clockmakers Sara Ware Bassett

She looked up at him audaciously, and he on his side could not take his eyes from her, so singular was the small, sparkling face.
The Marriage of William Ashe Mrs. Humphry Ward

“I wish to take them with me, if you please,” answered Dorothy audaciously.
The King’s Daughters Emily Sarah Holt

But it had never before been manifested to her audaciously in the human face.
The Garden Of Allah Robert Hichens

As a foil to his austerity, therefore, she would be audaciously gay in his presence.
The Spenders Harry Leon Wilson

White Scalper had disappeared with the unhappy victim whom he had so audaciously carried off.
The Freebooters Gustave Aimard

De Maistre audaciously denies that Voltaire ever did more than dip into Locke.
Voltaire John Morley

Soon after the arrival of the additional troops, Yermak audaciously started out to make further conquests.
Wealth of the World’s Waste Places and Oceania
Jewett Castello Gilson

adjective
recklessly bold or daring; fearless
impudent or presumptuous
adj.

1540s, “confident, intrepid,” from Middle French audacieux, from audace “boldness,” from Latin audacia “daring, boldness, courage,” from audax “brave, bold, daring,” but more often “bold” in a bad sense, “audacious, rash, foolhardy,” from audere “to dare, be bold.” Bad sense of “shameless” is attested from 1590s in English. Related: Audaciously.

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