Averring



to assert or affirm with confidence; declare in a positive or peremptory manner.
Law. to allege as a fact.
Historical Examples

The landlady was thus justified in averring that something had been done by somebody, albeit unable to point to anything specific.
Evan Harrington, Complete George Meredith

This he at first declined to do, averring that it was impossible to be elected.
The Life Of Abraham Lincoln Ward H. Lamon

Their adversaries denied it, averring that, as a class, they were “contented and happy.”
The Anti-Slavery Examiner, Omnibus American Anti-Slavery Society

averring that, in satisfaction of all tithes the customary annual sum of 20s.
The Church of Grasmere Mary L. Armitt

averring that the problem was national in scope, he asserted the constitutional authority of Congress to solve it.
The Journal of Negro History, Volume 7, 1922 Various

I think he is under a mistake in averring that there is any severity in the sheath spur.
Ladies on Horseback Nannie Lambert

On their return, he bade her lie down on the sofa in her boudoir and rest, averring that she looked languid and unlike herself.
Elsie’s New Relations Martha Finley

What if they did unite, afterward, in averring that the break had been planned by Winwood?
The Jacket (The Star-Rover) Jack London

Darnall answered, averring in his answer that he was a free man, and capable of conveying a good title.
Cotton is King and The Pro-Slavery Arguments Various

He promised him safe-conduct, averring that he had other means of gaining fame than by killing a man like him.
The Story of Norway Hjalmar H. Boyesen

verb (transitive) avers, averring, averred
to state positively; assert
(law) to allege as a fact or prove to be true
v.

late 14c., from Old French averer “verify,” from Vulgar Latin *adverare “make true, prove to be true,” from Latin ad- “to” (see ad-) + verus “true” (see very). Related: Averred; averring.

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  • Avers

    to assert or affirm with confidence; declare in a positive or peremptory manner. Law. to allege as a fact. Contemporary Examples Although di Giovanni had longed to be a mother, she was “not a very natural” one, she avers. Of Love and War Penelope Rowlands October 24, 2011 Historical Examples Three drops, he avers, of […]

  • Averse

    having a strong feeling of opposition, antipathy, repugnance, etc.; opposed: He is not averse to having a drink now and then. Contemporary Examples In Iraq, there is a real concern over the emergence of Alnusra Front and Salafists who are most averse to Shiites in the region. The Future Uncertain: An Iraqi on His Country […]



  • Aversely

    having a strong feeling of opposition, antipathy, repugnance, etc.; opposed: He is not averse to having a drink now and then. adjective (postpositive) usually foll by to. opposed, disinclined, or loath (of leaves, flowers, etc) turned away from the main stem Compare adverse (sense 4) adj. mid-15c., “turned away in mind or feeling,” from Old […]

  • Aversive conditioning

    a type of behavior conditioning in which noxious stimuli are associated with undesirable or unwanted behavior that is to be modified or abolished, as the use of nausea-inducing drugs in the treatment of alcoholism.



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