Averse



having a strong feeling of opposition, antipathy, repugnance, etc.; opposed:
He is not averse to having a drink now and then.
Contemporary Examples

In Iraq, there is a real concern over the emergence of Alnusra Front and Salafists who are most averse to Shiites in the region.
The Future Uncertain: An Iraqi on His Country John Kael Weston April 24, 2013

The fact is, though, country music has always been averse to controversy.
Vince Gill Confronts Fringe Groups and Gives Country Some Cred Malcolm Jones September 10, 2013

They are also averse to killing civilians, let alone the bubbie demographic.
How a Publicist’s Death Became a PR Nightmare Eric Dezenhall December 9, 2010

Among the people who seemed not averse to being interviewed was Msgr. Bob Weiss of St Rose of Lima Church.
Curse the Media in Newtown for Doing Too Little, Too Late on Guns Michael Daly December 19, 2012

The Roberts Court, it seems, is similarly not averse to helping protect women from themselves.
Impeach the Supreme Court Justices If They Overturn Health-Care Law David R. Dow April 2, 2012

Historical Examples

Black Meg, it may be explained, in the intervals of graver business was not averse to serving as an emissary of Venus.
Lysbeth H. Rider Haggard

Well, I was averse from going myself, but Winnie was all for peace and forgiveness.
The Stark Munro Letters J. Stark Munro

Joe was not averse to such a revelation, for his hazel rod and his “peek-stone” had already failed him.
Lippincott’s Magazine, Vol. 26, August, 1880 Various

averse had she been to this wedding from the moment that it had been broached to her.
Love-at-Arms Raphael Sabatini

He was, like ourselves, fond of adventure, and was not averse to its being accompanied by an element of danger.
Up the Orinoco and down the Magdalena H. J. Mozans

adjective
(postpositive) usually foll by to. opposed, disinclined, or loath
(of leaves, flowers, etc) turned away from the main stem Compare adverse (sense 4)
adj.

mid-15c., “turned away in mind or feeling,” from Old French avers and directly from Latin aversus “turned away, turned back,” past participle of avertere (see avert). Originally and usually in English in the mental sense, while avert is used in a physical sense.

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  • Aversely

    having a strong feeling of opposition, antipathy, repugnance, etc.; opposed: He is not averse to having a drink now and then. adjective (postpositive) usually foll by to. opposed, disinclined, or loath (of leaves, flowers, etc) turned away from the main stem Compare adverse (sense 4) adj. mid-15c., “turned away in mind or feeling,” from Old […]

  • Aversive conditioning

    a type of behavior conditioning in which noxious stimuli are associated with undesirable or unwanted behavior that is to be modified or abolished, as the use of nausea-inducing drugs in the treatment of alcoholism.



  • Aversion

    a strong feeling of dislike, opposition, repugnance, or antipathy (usually followed by to): a strong aversion to snakes and spiders. a cause or object of dislike; person or thing that causes antipathy: His pet aversion is guests who are always late. Obsolete. the act of averting; a turning away or preventing. Contemporary Examples Friedersdorf said […]

  • Aversion therapy

    a type of behavior conditioning in which noxious stimuli are associated with undesirable or unwanted behavior that is to be modified or abolished, as the use of nausea-inducing drugs in the treatment of alcoholism. noun (psychiatry) a method of suppressing an undesirable habit, such as excessive smoking, by causing the subject to associate an unpleasant […]



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