Backseat



a seat at the rear.
take a backseat, to occupy a secondary or inferior position:
Her writing has taken a backseat because of other demands on her time.
Contemporary Examples

But bilateral relations will take a backseat as legal and political issues pile up for Gilani.
Pakistani Prime Minister Gilani Convicted of Contempt Fasih Ahmed, Jahanzeb Aslam April 25, 2012

Edwards always liked the armrest up in the car when he got in so he could move around in the backseat.
Andrew Young’s Revenge Tina Brown January 30, 2010

He told everyone he was going to come in and be the leading scorer as a freshman and that we’d all have to take a backseat to him.
The PR Nightmare of Kris Humphries, Kim Kardashian’s Ex Marlow Stern July 11, 2012

Three decades ago, when Dick Cheney was an anonymous White House staffer, the Secret Service codename for him was “backseat.”
The GOP’s Three-Headed Monster James Mann December 24, 2009

If I do, I sit in the backseat and stay alert for whatever the driver does.
What It Feels Like For a Girl in Iraq Noor November 5, 2014

David Garcia is attempting to make a phone call in the backseat.
A Shooting on a Tribal Land Uncovers Feds Running Wild Caitlin Dickson August 25, 2014

While Washington, for now, has elected to take the backseat in this fight, the United States has a big stake in the outcome.
Al Qaeda’s Dangerous Play in Mali Bruce Riedel January 14, 2013

There is now great concern among some backseat drivers, especially on the Democratic side, about pro-Romney super PAC spending.
Romney May Outspend Obama but Not Beat Him in November Election James Warren August 24, 2012

Historical Examples

The baggage—two trunks, a showman’s keyster, two suitcases, a big duffle bag and handbags—was loaded on trailer and backseat.
David Lannarck, Midget George S. Harney

He sat in the backseat of the car, and his hair dragged behind him.
FreeChildrenStories.com Collection Daniel Errico

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  • Backset

    New England, Southern, and South Midland U.S. a setback; relapse; reverse. an eddy or countercurrent. (on a lock on a door or the like) the horizontal distance between the face through which the bolt passes and the center line of the knob stem or keyhole. Historical Examples The rascals had had one backset, but this […]

  • Back shaft

    a spindle carrying back gears.



  • Back shift

    noun (Brit) a group of workers who work a shift from late afternoon to midnight in an industry or occupation where a day shift or a night shift is also worked the period worked

  • Backshore

    the zone of the shore or beach above the high-water line, acted upon only by severe storms or exceptionally high tides. the area immediately adjacent to a sea cliff. berm (def 3). backshore (bāk’shôr’) The area of a shore that lies between the average high tide mark and the vegetation. The backshore is affected by […]



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