Badge



a special or distinctive mark, token, or device worn as a sign of allegiance, membership, authority, achievement, etc.:
a police badge; a merit badge.
any emblem, token, or distinctive mark:
He considered a slide rule as the badge of an engineering student.
a card bearing identifying information, as one’s name, symbol or place of employment, or academic affiliation, and often worn pinned to one’s clothing.
to furnish or mark with a badge.
Contemporary Examples

Announcing it in that cheerful way, with her badge and her glasses and her youth.
Who Has the Right to Write About War? Emily Gray Tedrowe July 11, 2014

For many supporters of GOProud, being called a “troll” was a badge of honor.
Inside the Implosion of GOProud, the Right’s Most Notorious Pro-Gay Group Tim Mak June 5, 2014

Each officer was supposed to call out his or her badge number on the radio.
The Spirit of 9/11—From Brooklyn and India, Oak Creek Heroes Face Evil Michael Daly August 6, 2012

Presidents like Teddy Roosevelt and Lyndon Johnson wore their aggressiveness as a badge of honor.
The Upside of Bullying Niall Stanage February 22, 2010

A badge typically costs $5 to $7 per day or approximately $35 seasonally and is sometimes included in rental packages.
Snooki Dictionary for Her Book, A Shore Thing Jaimie Etkin January 3, 2011

Historical Examples

Booger flashed his badge at me too fast for me to get a good look at it, but Zit in the front seat gave me a long look at his.
Little Brother Cory Doctorow

“Let me put my finger on the number for good luck,” and she touched the badge on his arm.
Thoroughbreds W. A. Fraser

“We won’t be held up—not if I show this,” said the detective, and exhibited the badge pinned to his vest.
The Rover Boys in Business Arthur M. Winfield

“De gent could buy a badge and get in,” volunteered Old Bill.
Thoroughbreds W. A. Fraser

Fane pushed past the secretary and went up to the desk, showing Mallin his badge and then serving the papers.
Little Fuzzy Henry Beam Piper

noun
a distinguishing emblem or mark worn to signify membership, employment, achievement, etc
any revealing feature or mark
n.

mid-14c., perhaps from Anglo-French bage or from Anglo-Latin bagis, plural of bagia “emblem,” all of unknown origin.

noun

A police officer (1920s+ Underworld)

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  • Badge engineering

    noun the practice of remaking one model of automobile as another for a different manufacturer, esp. when companies merge operations; two identical automobiles marketed under different model names Examples The Honda Accord is the Acura TSX, an example of badge engineering. Word Origin badge ‘brand name’

  • Badge of honor

    noun a medal or token signifying an awarded honor or distinction; also in figurative use Examples The martial artist felt that cauliflower ear was a badge of honor. Word Origin 1578



  • Badger

    any of various burrowing, carnivorous mammals of the family Mustelidae, as Taxidea taxus, of North America, and Meles meles, of Europe and Asia. the fur of this mammal. Australian. a wombat. bandicoot (def 2). (initial capital letter) a native or inhabitant of Wisconsin (the Badger State) (used as a nickname). a swablike device for cleaning […]

  • Badged

    a special or distinctive mark, token, or device worn as a sign of allegiance, membership, authority, achievement, etc.: a police badge; a merit badge. any emblem, token, or distinctive mark: He considered a slide rule as the badge of an engineering student. a card bearing identifying information, as one’s name, symbol or place of employment, […]



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