Baguette



Jewelry.

a rectangular shape given to a small gem, especially a diamond, by cutting and polishing.
a gem having this shape.

Architecture. a small convex molding, especially one of semicircular section.
a long, narrow loaf of French bread.
Contemporary Examples

Cut a sandwich-length piece of baguette and slice it open like you would to make a hero.
Would You Eat This Sandwich? Petrit Husenaj October 3, 2010

You can start the day with a croissant and baguette, then end the day in a bistro or some place high-end, like Pierre Gagnaire.
Fresh Picks George Mendes September 6, 2010

She made me a grilled cheddar and bacon on a baguette the other day for lunch with spicy blue corn chips and a beer.
The Original American Locavore Sarah Whitman-Salkin July 20, 2009

I remember scurrying back to the hotel, baguette in hand with the pâté tucked under my arm.
For the Love of Pâté Molly Hannon January 4, 2011

He and I spent 48 hours in Seoul together a few years ago, and we pretty much only ate at Paris baguette.
On the Road With Gideon Lewis-Kraus: How I Write Noah Charney July 24, 2012

Historical Examples

I found the baguette turn very strong, so that it soon twisted and broke.
The Divining Rod Charles Latimer

Standing where there was no water, the baguette remained motionless.
The Divining Rod Charles Latimer

After seeing him do this repeatedly, the whole party tried the baguette in succession, but without effect.
The Divining Rod Charles Latimer

I think I must put just a baguette d’or on the drawings, and when you see them on my walls I don’t think you will disapprove.
The Life, Letters and Work of Frederic Leighton Mrs. Russell Barrington

The baguette of Delille is no shepherd’s crook; it has more the fashion of a drumstick,—baguette de tambour.
Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 12, August, 1863, No. 70 Various

noun
a narrow French stick loaf
a small gem cut as a long rectangle
the shape of such a gem
(architect) a small moulding having a semicircular cross section
noun

a small handbag shaped like a long narrow bread loaf
Word Origin

1995-2000
n.

1727, a type of architectural ornament, from French baguette (16c.), from Italian bacchetta, literally “a small rod,” diminutive of bacchio “rod,” from Latin baculum “a stick” (see bacillus). Meaning “a diamond cut long” is from 1926; that of “a long, thin loaf of French bread” is from 1958.

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