Bail bond

a formal document that gives bail for someone to be released from custody.
Historical Examples

And when Nelson was in trouble over those stolen gold coins Uncle Jason went on his bail bond and hired the lawyer to defend him.
The Mission of Janice Day Helen Beecher Long

The bail bond was made out and signed, and the prisoner released.
The Colonel’s Dream Charles W. Chesnutt

Had Tulitz committed forgery, his bail bond would scarcely have been less than $10,000.
Tin-Types Taken in the Streets of New York Lemuel Ely Quigg

Heaven bless you for that bail bond, though endorsed in a lie, honest ship-captain!
A Day’s Ride Charles James Lever

“Perfectly,” said he, standing erect, and giving even in his attitude a sort of bail bond for future dignity.
A Day’s Ride Charles James Lever

The bail bond I was willing, eager even to forfeit, if that would end the matter.
Seven Wives and Seven Prisons L.A. Abbott

Some months later he signed the bail bond of Jefferson Davis, and this provoked a torrent of public indignation.
Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 12, Slice 5 Various

Then he ups and signs the bail bond for a house and lot that he has never seen in his life.
True Stories of Crime From the District Attorney’s Office Arthur Train

a document in which a prisoner and one or more sureties guarantee that the prisoner will attend the court hearing of the charge against him if he is released on bail


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