Bailiwick



the district within which a bailie or bailiff has jurisdiction.
a person’s area of skill, knowledge, authority, or work:
to confine suggestions to one’s own bailiwick.
Contemporary Examples

He does so, hands in his star and rides on, leaving his bailiwick in the condition his patrons wanted.
Summers Gave Obama Cover Michael Thomas September 21, 2010

Historical Examples

There was no longer any motive for occupying the bailiwick of Bergdorf when there were no Prussians in that quarter.
Memoirs of Napoleon Bonaparte, Complete Louis Antoine Fauvelet de Bourrienne

But would she not find me, instead, and drive me out of her bailiwick?
Wood Folk at School William J. Long

Carolyn May was quite as much puzzled by that expression as she had been by bailiwick.
Carolyn of the Corners Ruth Belmore Endicott

Gimpy Gordon scuttled out of my bailiwick almost on a dead run.
The Big Fix George Oliver Smith

“But the galley now lies in this river, which is within my bailiwick,” retorted Brakkeleye stoutly.
The Winning of the Golden Spurs Percy F. Westerman

You must keep out of her bailiwick if you want to keep her friendship.
The Little Colonel: Maid of Honor Annie Fellows Johnston

In 1733 the bailiwick was transferred to Vevey and just seventy years later the castle became the property of Vaud.
The Spell of Switzerland Nathan Haskell Dole

Meere succeeded at the assizes in sustaining his right to the bailiwick.
Sir Walter Ralegh William Stebbing

This guy, Lester, makes out a bond before we’re within two days’ drive of his bailiwick.
Square Deal Sanderson Charles Alden Seltzer

noun
(law) the area over which a bailiff has jurisdiction
a person’s special field of interest, authority, or skill
n.

“district of a bailiff,” early 15c., baillifwik, from bailiff (q.v.) + Middle English form of Old English wic “village” (see wick (n.2)). Figurative sense of “one’s natural or proper sphere” is first recorded 1843.

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  • Bailment

    the delivery of personal property returnable to the bailor after being held for some purpose. Historical Examples This transaction with C constitutes a bailment, in which the bailor does not have title to the property bailed. Cyclopedia of Commerce, Accountancy, Business Administration, v. 3 Various It is a case of bailment,” said he to Rollo, […]

  • Baillie

    noun Dame Isobel. 1895–1983, British soprano Historical Examples All these matters, however, had been absorbed at length in baillie’s interest in Mr. Sharp’s mission. The Life of John Milton, Volume 5 (of 7), 1654-1660 David Masson baillie Pegram had all the pride of his lineage and his class. The Master of Warlock George Cary Eggleston […]



  • Bailor

    a person who delivers personal property in bailment. Historical Examples This transaction with C constitutes a bailment, in which the bailor does not have title to the property bailed. Cyclopedia of Commerce, Accountancy, Business Administration, v. 3 Various Examples of bailments for the sole benefit of the bailee are loans to the bailee without compensation […]

  • Bailsman

    a person who gives bail or acts as surety. Historical Examples Speke had his bedding amidships, spread on reeds; the cook and bailsman sat facing him, and Bombay and one Belooch behind him. Great African Travellers W.H.G. Kingston



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