Baldric



a belt, sometimes richly ornamented, worn diagonally from shoulder to hip, supporting a sword, horn, etc.
Historical Examples

And first a shield he fashioned, vast and strong, with threefold rim, and baldric of silver.
Stories from the Iliad H. L. Havell

He set the example by putting one on like a baldric, Mark doing the same with the other.
The Black Tor George Manville Fenn

To a baldric also was attached the quiver of the archer, and sometimes such a band was merely worn as a decoration.
The Heritage of Dress Wilfred Mark Webb

Their cartridge-pouch and their bayonet are slung to their right side by a baldric.
The Human Race Louis Figuier

It was D’Artagnan’s sword, which, slipping from his baldric, had fallen on the sonorous flooring.
The Man in the Iron Mask Alexandre Dumas, Pere

A “Sheffield whittle” stuck in his baldric; and in a pouch was deposited the remnant of a magnificent pasty.
Traditions of Lancashire, Volume 1 (of 2) John Roby

The Knight undid the clasp of the baldric, and indulged his fellow-traveller, who immediately hung the bugle round his own neck.
Ivanhoe Walter Scott

In front of her was a damsel bearing in baldric a great sword with haft of emerald and tassels of jewel-encrusted gold.
The Science of Fairy Tales Edwin Sidney Hartland

And every buck’s tines should be reckoned as soon as a man can hang a baldric or a leash188 thereupon and not otherwise.
The Master of Game Second Duke of York, Edward

His sword glittered with golden ornaments, and the scabbard was of silver, and the baldric of gold.
Stories from the Iliad H. L. Havell

noun
a wide silk sash or leather belt worn over the right shoulder to the left hip for carrying a sword, etc
n.

c.1300, “belt worn over the shoulder,” from Old French baldre (Modern French baudrier “shoulder-belt”), which probably is from Latin balteus “belt,” said by Varro to be of Etruscan origin. The English word perhaps influenced by Middle High German balderich (which itself is from the Old French).

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