of, near, or on the Baltic Sea.
of or relating to the Baltic States.
of or relating to a group of languages, as Latvian, Lithuanian, and Old Prussian, that constitute a branch of the Indo-European family.
the Baltic branch of the Indo-European family of languages.
Contemporary Examples

Paul Krugman has an odd thing against the Baltic states and their decision to use austerity post-recession.
Why the Bashing on the Baltics, Dr. Krugman? Justin Green September 26, 2012

Although it took 21 years after Peter ran away at the battle of Narva, Russia finally got a Baltic coastline.
Russian History Is on Our Side: Putin Will Surely Screw Himself P. J. O’Rourke May 10, 2014

In 1944, the Nazi influence waned, allowing the Soviet tide to come crashing back down on the Baltic shores.
Secret KGB Torture House Opens Its Doors in Riga Brandon Presser June 3, 2014

Like Peter the Great on the Baltic, she got the swampy part.
Russian History Is on Our Side: Putin Will Surely Screw Himself P. J. O’Rourke May 10, 2014

In the Baltic states, German records indicate that the Einsatzgruppen units killed 218,000 Jews by February 1, 1942.
The Gestapo Still Sets the Bar for Evil James A. Warren July 12, 2014

Historical Examples

A lighter used in Holland, and the ports of the Baltic, for loading and unloading merchant ships.
The Sailor’s Word-Book William Henry Smyth

The ‘Nixa’ along the Baltic coast was once, however, much feared by the fishermen.
Storyology Benjamin Taylor

And when Hgni heard of Srli’s death, he went raiding in the Baltic the same summer, and was victorious everywhere.
Stories and Ballads of the Far Past Nora Kershaw

Chicago is remarkable chiefly as a grain city—like Odessa, on the Baltic.
Old Mackinaw W. P. Strickland.

The east coast of the Baltic was considered tributary to Novgorod.
The Story of Russia R. Van Bergen, M.A.

denoting or relating to the Baltic Sea or the Baltic States
of, denoting, or characteristic of Baltic as a group of languages
(Brit, informal) extremely cold
a branch of the Indo-European family of languages consisting of Lithuanian, Latvian, and Old Prussian
short for Baltic Sea
Also called Baltic Exchange. an international market for shipbrokers in the City of London: formerly housed in the Baltic Exchange building which was demolished after terrorist bomb damage in 1992

1580s, from Medieval Latin Balticus, perhaps from Lithuanian baltas “white” or Scandinavian balta “straight” (in reference to its narrow entranceway). In German, it is Ostsee, literally “east sea.”


Read Also:

  • Baltic sea

    a sea in N Europe, bounded by Denmark, Sweden, Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, and Germany. About 160,000 sq. mi. (414,000 sq. km). Contemporary Examples The Russian Air Force also flew additional sorties over the Baltic Sea with tactical strike fighters on Oct. 29. Are Russian Bombers Flying Nuclear Drills Near Europe—Or Just Testing NATO’s […]

  • Baltic centre for contemporary art

    noun an arts centre in Gateshead, NE England: formerly a 1950s grain warehouse: used for its present purpose since 2002. It has no permanent collection, but rather hosts a programme of temporary exhibitions and events

  • Baltic shield

    noun Also called Scandinavian Shield.. the wide area of ancient rock in Scandinavia See shield (sense 7)

  • Baltic states

    Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, and sometimes Finland. plural noun the republics of Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania, which became constituent republics of the former Soviet Union in 1940, regaining their independence in 1991 Sometimes shortened to the Baltics

Disclaimer: Baltic definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.