Banach-tarski paradox



banach-tarski paradox

mathematics
It is possible to cut a solid ball into finitely many pieces (actually about half a dozen), and then put the pieces together again to get two solid balls, each the same size as the original.
This paradox is a consequence of the Axiom of Choice.
(1995-03-29)

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