Banlieue



noun
a suburb of a city
Contemporary Examples

The banlieue setting is rough and rife with violence and drug trafficking.
‘Girlhood’: Coming of Age in France’s Projects Molly Hannon November 24, 2014

She must leave the banlieue, just as she insists to the school counselor, that she must go to high school.
‘Girlhood’: Coming of Age in France’s Projects Molly Hannon November 24, 2014

Hot on the heels of the November 2005 banlieue riots, tensions remained high.
A Horror Story of True-Life Anti-Semitism in France Tracy McNicoll April 27, 2014

Historical Examples

Next day the outraged Chapter excommunicated the town and banlieue.
The Story of Chartres Cecil Headlam

Inexhaustible as is the banlieue of Paris you are always glad to get back.
Paris Vistas Helen Davenport Gibbons

Gavroche looked and saw that this came from the men of the banlieue.
Les Misrables Victor Hugo

Ninety-one bombs were dropped that night within the old fortifications; more than two hundred were showered on the banlieue.
The Book of Susan Lee Wilson Dodd

La gare de Londres no more great than a station of banlieue, near to Paris.
Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 109, August 10, 1895 Various

This talent of divining, possessed in a high degree by the Parisians, has never passed the banlieue.
Louis XIV and La Grande Mademoiselle Arvede Barine

Paris, centre, banlieue, circumference; this constitutes all the earth to those children.
Les Misrables Victor Hugo

n.

French, “suburbs, precincts,” from Vulgar Latin *banleuca, from ban (see ban (n.1)) + leuca “a league (of distance),” in Medieval Latin, “indefinite extent of territory” (see league (n.2)). So, “the extent of a ban; the territory within which a ban is of force,” hence, “territory subject to one jurisdiction.”

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