without civilizing influences; uncivilized; primitive:
barbaric invaders.
of, like, or befitting barbarians:
a barbaric empire; barbaric practices.
crudely rich or splendid:
barbaric decorations.
Historical Examples

The Sikhs who succeeded the Afghans were not so barbarically cruel, but they were hard and rough masters.
Kashmir Sir Francis Edward Younghusband

She was dreaming that Anna Zanidov stood before her in the barbarically painted evening gown.
Sacrifice Stephen French Whitman

With cool assurance he made his offer to the stately plumed, suspicious grandees of the barbarically magnificent court.
Jewels of Gwahlur Robert E. Howard

For the nomad of the fire-wheel was a girl, tall and slender, barbarically arrayed in the holiday garb of a Seminole chief.
Diane of the Green Van Leona Dalrymple

It was only Carlotta on her barbarically betrapped and besaddled mule.
The Morals of Marcus Ordeyne William J. Locke

These should be barbarically glowing, since it is partly in their wild flare of color that the beauty of the Blanket Dance lies.
Patriotic Plays and Pageants for Young People Constance D’Arcy Mackay

The outer walls are barbarically huge and heavy, and superb in color.
The Near East Robert Hichens

The rhythms are joyously, barbarically, at times almost frenetically, free.
Musical Portraits Paul Rosenfeld

It was barbarically hung with banners, but it was not exactly a cheery place.
The Pirates of Ersatz Murray Leinster

of or characteristic of barbarians
primitive or unsophisticated; unrestrained

late 15c., “uncultured, uncivilized, unpolished,” from French barbarique (15c.), from Latin barbaricus “foreign, strange, outlandish,” from Greek barbarikos “like a foreigner,” from barbaros “foreign, rude” (see barbarian). Meaning “pertaining to barbarians” is from 1660s.


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