a defensive barrier hastily constructed, as in a street, to stop an enemy.
any barrier that obstructs passage.
to obstruct or block with a barricade:
barricading the streets to prevent an attack.
to shut in and defend with or as if with a barricade:
The rebels had barricaded themselves in the old city.
Contemporary Examples

The most radical activists began pushing and rocking a bus that had barricaded the way to the Parliament building.
Ukraine Mobs Set Policemen On Fire Anna Nemtsova January 18, 2014

Some subway exits in Causeway Bay, a major shopping district, were barricaded.
Is Hong Kong Tiananmen 2.0? Brendon Hong September 28, 2014

For a while, they barricaded the entrance to the American headquarters of Deutsche Bank.
Occupy Wall Street Flexes Its Muscle With Massive Protest Michelle Goldberg November 16, 2011

They barricaded themselves in the unfinished two-story home.
Did Israel Execute Jihadists in Gaza? Jesse Rosenfeld September 6, 2014

There is now a barricaded protestor checkpoint near the salon, which guards the rear entrance to the City Parliament Building.
Slouching Towards Maidan: An American Hair-Trader Reflects On Ukraine’s Protests Vijai Maheshwari December 14, 2013

Historical Examples

The Park gate was closed and barricaded, but was forced by the military.
The Impeachment of The House of Brunswick Charles Bradlaugh

Darians have barricaded themselves in the control-rooms of most if not all your ships.
Pariah Planet Murray Leinster

The door at the front I soon padlocked on the outside, and barricaded within, leaving the back door as the only entrance.
The Trail of a Sourdough May Kellogg Sullivan

So he barricaded his end by sitting on it, and said triumphantly: “My hat, if you please.”
The Manxman Hall Caine

He was at first, as Dr. Bowditch told us, ‘barricaded in his shop on Cambridge street.’
The Underground Railroad William Still

a barrier for defence, esp one erected hastily, as during street fighting
verb (transitive)
to erect a barricade across (an entrance, passageway, etc) or at points of access to (a room, district of a town, etc): they barricaded the door
(usually passive) to obstruct; block: his mind was barricaded against new ideas

1590s, from Middle French barricader “to barricade” (1550s), from barrique “barrel,” from Spanish barrica “barrel,” from baril (see barrel). Revolutionary associations began during 1588 Huguenot riots in Paris, when large barrels filled with earth and stones were set up in the streets. Related: Barricaded; barricading.

1640s, from barricade (v.). Earlier was barricado (1580s) with false Spanish ending (see -ado).


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