Basher



to strike with a crushing or smashing blow.
Chiefly British, Canadian. to hurl harsh verbal abuse at.
a crushing blow.
Informal. a thoroughly enjoyable, lively party.
have a bash (at), British. to attempt; make an attempt.
on the bash, British. working as a prostitute.
Historical Examples

He was talking quietly and without rancor, but he had a vibe like a basher.
Makers Cory Doctorow

Louie and the other “basher” started toward him, but stopped at a gesture from “Slim.”
Spring Street James H. Richardson

With a sweep of his arm the “basher” crashed a black-jack against his skull.
Spring Street James H. Richardson

The “basher” swung up from the hip with his right arm, aiming for John’s face.
Spring Street James H. Richardson

John threw the chair at the “basher” before him and dashed to the other side of the room.
Spring Street James H. Richardson

In the former route, basher is given as only three hours from Kuka.
Narrative of a Mission to Central Africa Performed in the Years 1850-51, Volume 2 James Richardson

verb
(transitive) to strike violently or crushingly
(transitive; often foll by in, down, etc) to smash, break, etc, with a crashing blow: to bash a door down
(intransitive) foll by into. to crash (into); collide (with): to bash into a lamppost
to dent or be dented: this tin is bashed, this cover won’t bash easily
noun
a heavy blow, as from a fist
a dent; indentation
a party
(informal) have a bash, to make an attempt
n.

1882, agent noun from bash (v.).
v.

“to strike violently,” 1640s, perhaps of Scandinavian origin, from Old Norse *basca “to strike” (cf. Swedish basa “to baste, whip, flog, lash,” Danish baske “to beat, strike, cudgel”); or the whole group might be independently derived and echoic. Figurative sense of “abuse verbally or in writing” is from 1948. Related: Bashed; bashing.
n.

“a heavy blow,” 1805, from bash (v.). Meaning “an attempt” is attested by 1948. On a bash “on a drunken spree” is slang from 1901, which gave the word its sense of “party.”

noun

A party, esp a good, exciting one: Her little soiree turned into a real bash (1940s+)
An attempt; crack, whack: Let’s have a bash at moving this thing (1940s+ British)

verb

To hit; clobber, sock (1860s+)
To criticize, esp destructively: bashing Google more than Microsoft now

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    to strike with a crushing or smashing blow. Chiefly British, Canadian. to hurl harsh verbal abuse at. a crushing blow. Informal. a thoroughly enjoyable, lively party. have a bash (at), British. to attempt; make an attempt. on the bash, British. working as a prostitute. Contemporary Examples Matthew Schmitz bashes Mumford and Sons over at First […]



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