Bason



a basin.
Historical Examples

The pantler, without making any oral answer, presented him with the sponge, and held the bason of water in the manner directed.
Hildebrand Anonymous

Then set the bason in a saucepan of water, the top of which will just fit it, or on a hot hearth, and stir it till it grows thick.
The Cook and Housekeeper’s Complete and Universal Dictionary; Including a System of Modern Cookery, in all Its Various Branches, Mary Eaton

When melted, pour it into a bason, and beat it with two spoonfuls of brandy.
The Cook and Housekeeper’s Complete and Universal Dictionary; Including a System of Modern Cookery, in all Its Various Branches, Mary Eaton

Lay a paste of suet in a bason, put in the rolled steaks, cover the bason with a paste, and pinch the edges to keep in the gravy.
The Cook and Housekeeper’s Complete and Universal Dictionary; Including a System of Modern Cookery, in all Its Various Branches, Mary Eaton

I cannot agree with you, Sir; a bason of cold water or a horse whip will cure laziness.’
Life Of Johnson, Volume 5 Boswell

The pudding will be lighter, if only made in a bason, then turned out into a pudding cloth, and boiled in plenty of water.
The Cook and Housekeeper’s Complete and Universal Dictionary; Including a System of Modern Cookery, in all Its Various Branches, Mary Eaton

I had Some water exposed in a bason in which the ice was 3/4 of an inch thick this morning.
The Journals of Lewis and Clark Meriwether Lewis and William Clark

In one corner of the church the bason for holy water is yet unbroken.
A Journey to the Western Isles of Scotland Samuel Johnson

I hope you’ll meet with something or other in this bason that, you like.
The Travels and Adventures of James Massey Simon Tyssot de Patot

A bason was fetched that he might wash off the dust and cobwebs in the passage.
Sandra Belloni, Complete George Meredith

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