wet, spongy ground with soil composed mainly of decayed vegetable matter.
an area or stretch of such ground.
to sink in or as if in a bog (often followed by down):
We were bogged down by overwork.
bog in, Australian Slang. to eat heartily and ravenously.
verb (intransitive, adverb) (Austral & NZ, informal) bogs, bogging, bogged
to start energetically on a task
to start eating; tuck in
wet spongy ground consisting of decomposing vegetation, which ultimately forms peat
an area of such ground
a place or thing that prevents or slows progress or improvement
a slang word for lavatory (sense 1)
(Austral, slang) the act or an instance of defecating
An area of wet, spongy ground consisting mainly of decayed or decaying peat moss (sphagnum) and other vegetation. Bogs form as the dead vegetation sinks to the bottom of a lake or pond, where it decays slowly to form peat. Peat bogs are important to global ecology, since the undecayed peat moss stores large amounts of carbon that would otherwise be released back into the atmosphere. Global warming may accelerate decay in peat bogs and release more carbon dioxide, which in turn may cause further warming.
El Dorado International Airport (Bogotá, Colombia)


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