Bother



to give trouble to; annoy; pester; worry:
His baby sister bothered him for candy.
to bewilder; confuse:
His inability to understand the joke bothered him.
to take the trouble; trouble or inconvenience oneself:
Don’t bother to call. He has no time to bother with trifles.
something troublesome, burdensome, or annoying:
Doing the laundry every week can be a terrible bother.
effort, work, or worry:
Gardening takes more bother than it’s worth.
a worried or perplexed state:
Don’t get into such a bother about small matters.
someone or something that bothers or annoys:
My cousin is a perpetual bother to me.
Chiefly British. (used to express mild irritation.)
one and the other; two together:
He met both sisters. Both performances were canceled.
the one as well as the other:
Both of us were going to the party.
alike; equally:
He is both ready and willing.
Contemporary Examples

Does Jeffrey MacDonald Belong in Jail? Megan McArdle January 2, 2013
‘Breaking Bad’ Finale, ‘Homeland’ Premiere: How to Survive DVRmageddon Jason Lynch September 28, 2013
Inside the Salahi Split Diane Dimond September 15, 2011
What Obama Should Tell Wall Street Charlie Gasparino October 19, 2009
Afghanistan: The Taliban Pile Onto Petraeus Sami Yousafzai November 15, 2012

Historical Examples

The Lost Wagon James Arthur Kjelgaard
In the Midst of Alarms Robert Barr
The Luminous Face Carolyn Wells
Thoroughbreds W. A. Fraser
Once a Week Alan Alexander Milne

verb
(transitive) to give annoyance, pain, or trouble to; irritate: his bad leg is bothering him again
(transitive) to trouble (a person) by repeatedly disturbing; pester: stop bothering your father!
(intransitive) to take the time or trouble; concern oneself: don’t bother to come with me
(transitive) to make (a person) alarmed or confused: the thought of her husband’s return clearly bothered her
noun
a state of worry, trouble, or confusion
a person or thing that causes fuss, trouble, or annoyance
(informal) a disturbance or fight; trouble (esp in the phrase a spot of bother)
interjection
(mainly Brit) an exclamation of slight annoyance
determiner

the two; two considered together: both dogs were dirty
(as pronoun): both are to blame

conjunction
(coordinating) used preceding words, phrases, or clauses joined by and, used to emphasize that not just one, but also the other of the joined elements is included: both Ellen and Keith enjoyed the play, both new and exciting
v.
adj., pron.

both barrels, with
both feet on the ground, with

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    (used as an exclamation indicating vexation or annoyance.) the act or state of bothering or the state of being bothered. Historical Examples King of the Air Herbert Strang Love Letters of Nathaniel Hawthorne, Volume 2 of 2 Nathaniel Hawthorne The Monster and Other Stories Stephen Crane Seven Short Plays Lady Gregory The Revolution in Tanner’s […]



  • Bothered

    to give trouble to; annoy; pester; worry: His baby sister bothered him for candy. to bewilder; confuse: His inability to understand the joke bothered him. to take the trouble; trouble or inconvenience oneself: Don’t bother to call. He has no time to bother with trifles. something troublesome, burdensome, or annoying: Doing the laundry every week […]

  • Bothering

    to give trouble to; annoy; pester; worry: His baby sister bothered him for candy. to bewilder; confuse: His inability to understand the joke bothered him. to take the trouble; trouble or inconvenience oneself: Don’t bother to call. He has no time to bother with trifles. something troublesome, burdensome, or annoying: Doing the laundry every week […]



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