Bring–around



to carry, convey, conduct, or cause (someone or something) to come with, to, or toward the speaker:
Bring the suitcase to my house. He brought his brother to my office.
to cause to come to or toward oneself; attract:
Her scream brought the police. He brought honor to his family by his heroism.
to cause to occur or exist:
The medication brought instant relief.
to cause to come into a particular position, state, or effect:
to bring the car to a stop.
to cause to appear or occur in the mind; evoke or recall:
The letter brought her memories of youth.
to persuade, convince, compel, or induce:
She couldn’t bring herself to sell the painting.
to sell for; fetch:
These lamps will bring a good price.
Law. to commence:
to bring an action for damages.
bring about, to accomplish; cause:
Land reform brought about a great change in the lives of the common people.
bring around/round,

to convince of a belief or opinion; persuade:
I think we can bring him around to agreeing with the plan.
to restore to consciousness, as after a faint.
to bring as a visitor:
They brought around a new employee this morning.

bring down,

to injure, capture, or kill:
He brought down several ducks on his last hunting trip.
to lessen; reduce:
I won’t buy that lamp unless they bring down the price.
Slang. to cause to be in low spirits; depress:
The bad news brought him down.

bring forth,

to give birth to; deliver; bear:
to bring forth a son.
to give rise to; introduce:
to bring forth a proposal for reducing costs.

bring forward,

to bring to view; show.
to present for consideration; adduce:
to bring forward an opinion.

bring in,

to yield, as profits or income:
My part-time job doesn’t bring in much, but I enjoy it.
to present officially; submit:
The jury brought in its verdict.
to cause to operate or yield:
They brought in a gusher on his property.
to present for consideration, approval, etc.; introduce:
She brought in six new members last month.

bring off, to accomplish, carry out, or achieve (something):
He brought off his speech with ease.
bring on,

to cause to happen or exist; bring about:
This incident will surely bring on a crisis.
to introduce; cause to appear:
Bring on the clowns.

bring out,

to expose; reveal.
to make noticeable or conspicuous in a contrast.
to publish, as a book or play.
to introduce officially into society:
to bring out a debutante.

bring to,

to bring back to consciousness; revive.
Nautical. to head (a vessel) close to or into the wind so as to halt.

bring up,

to care for during childhood; rear.
to introduce or mention for attention, discussion, action, or consideration.
to vomit.
to stop or cause to stop quickly:
to bring up a car at the curb.
Nautical. (of a vessel) to cause to halt, as by lowering an anchor or running aground; fetch up.

Historical Examples

The Northern Light E. Werner
The Wit and Humor of America, Volume IX (of X) Various
The Flying Mercury Eleanor M. Ingram
The Lost Princess of Oz L. Frank Baum
The Allen House T. S. Arthur
The Red Tavern Charles Raymond Macauley
Evenings at Donaldson Manor Maria J. McIntosh
St. Nicholas Magazine for Boys and Girls, Vol. 5, July 1878, No. 9 Various
The Passion for Life Joseph Hocking
John Gayther’s Garden and the Stories Told Therein Frank R. Stockton

verb (transitive) brings, bringing, brought
to carry, convey, or take (something or someone) to a designated place or person: bring that book to me, will you bring Jessica to Tom’s party?
to cause to happen or occur to (oneself or another): to bring disrespect on oneself
to cause to happen as a consequence: responsibility brings maturity
to cause to come to mind: it brought back memories
to cause to be in a certain state, position, etc: the punch brought him to his knees
to force, persuade, or make (oneself): I couldn’t bring myself to do it
to sell for; fetch: the painting brought 20 pounds
(law)

to institute (proceedings, charges, etc)
to put (evidence, etc) before a tribunal

bring forth, to give birth to
bring home to

to convince of: his account brought home to us the gravity of the situation
to place the blame on

bring to bear, See bear1 (sense 17)
v.
Also, bring round.
Conduct someone or convey something to others. For example, Anne brought around the new intern to meet the nursing staff, or The clerk will bring round the papers for you to sign. [ Late 1800s ]
Also, bring to. Restore to health or consciousness. For example, Some fresh air will help bring him to. [ First half of 1800s ]
Convert or persuade someone, as in The senator was sure he could bring around the other committee members. [ Mid-1800s ]

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