Captivation



to attract and hold the attention or interest of, as by beauty or excellence; enchant:
Her blue eyes and red hair captivated him.
Obsolete. to capture; subjugate.
Historical Examples

The marvel of their captivation lay in the spell of the enchanter.
A Day’s Ride Charles James Lever

There was a captivation in its promise of adventure that he felt to be irresistible.
Tony Butler Charles James Lever

He knew that Clare Kenwardine was not the girl to attempt his captivation merely because he had shown himself susceptible.
Brandon of the Engineers Harold Bindloss

He still acknowledged that her beauty was the most complete; but he found in Camilla a variety that was captivation.
Camilla Fanny Burney

If all the varied hues of captivation her changing humor wore were but the deep practised lures of coquetry?
The Knight Of Gwynne, Vol. I (of II) Charles James Lever

Manner is perhaps more seducing than mere beauty; but where they are allied, the captivation is irresistible.
Rattlin the Reefer Edward Howard

Now Julia L’Estrange was a very pretty girl, and with a captivation of manner which to the young sailor was irresistible.
The Bramleighs Of Bishop’s Folly Charles James Lever

And he opened his watch-case as he spoke, and displayed a small miniature in enamel, of marvellous beauty and captivation.
The Bramleighs Of Bishop’s Folly Charles James Lever

She was not, it is true, of the ordinary type of beauty, whose chief ornament is an effort at captivation.
A Dozen Ways Of Love Lily Dougall

Certainly, he reflected, no preparations were in progress in this quarter for his captivation.
The Storm Centre Charles Egbert Craddock

verb (transitive)
to hold the attention of by fascinating; enchant
an obsolete word for capture
v.

1520s, “to enthrall with charm,” from Late Latin captivatus, past participle of captivare “to take, capture,” from captivus (see captive). Literal sense (1550s) is rare or obsolete in English, which uses capture (q.v.). Latin captare “to take, hold” also had a transferred sense of “to entice, entrap, allure.” Related: Captivated; captivating; captivatingly.

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  • Captivative

    to attract and hold the attention or interest of, as by beauty or excellence; enchant: Her blue eyes and red hair captivated him. Obsolete. to capture; subjugate. verb (transitive) to hold the attention of by fascinating; enchant an obsolete word for capture v. 1520s, “to enthrall with charm,” from Late Latin captivatus, past participle of […]

  • Captivator

    to attract and hold the attention or interest of, as by beauty or excellence; enchant: Her blue eyes and red hair captivated him. Obsolete. to capture; subjugate. Historical Examples She’s a dressmaker by trade, she says; and a captivator of foolish young men by nature—don’t go anigh her. All Sorts and Conditions of Men Walter […]



  • Captive

    a prisoner. a person who is enslaved or dominated; slave: He is the captive of his own fears. made or held prisoner, especially in war: captive troops. kept in confinement or restraint: captive animals. enslaved by love, beauty, etc.; captivated: her captive beau. of or relating to a captive. managed as an affiliate or subsidiary […]

  • Captive audience

    Listeners or onlookers who have no choice but to attend. For example, It’s a required course and, knowing he has a captive audience, the professor rambles on endlessly. This expression, first recorded in 1902, uses captive in the sense of “unable to escape.” Contemporary Examples “This is kind of a captive audience,” explained Sgt. Sean […]



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