Caravel



a small Spanish or Portuguese sailing vessel of the Middle Ages and later, usually lateen-rigged on two or three masts.
Historical Examples

In this situation, a great number of the enemy boarded the caravel, and used our men very ill .
A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Vol. II Robert Kerr

In spite of his seamanship, the caravel was wrecked on the island of Cuba.
South American Fights and Fighters Cyrus Townsend Brady

A caravel was a small light bark, more fitted to sail on a river than to cross the stormy seas.
The Boy’s Book of Heroes Helena Peake

They insisted on embarking in the caravel and following Columbus.
Notable Voyagers W.H.G. Kingston and Henry Frith

When a short time out, a caravel came flapping past them, after having been several hours in sight, and the admiral spoke her.
Mercedes of Castile J. Fenimore Cooper

Every caravel that came from the New World brought two things.
Christopher Columbus, Complete Filson Young

These meditations were ended by a mighty buffet of wind that smote the caravel and sent it flying northwest.
Days of the Discoverers L. Lamprey

He was eleven days by the way, and found the other caravel in waiting.
A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Vol. III Robert Kerr

The Negroes then came alongside of our ships, the largest of the almadias coming up to the caravel in which I was.
A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Vol. II Robert Kerr

As yet only one caravel has come into port, but the rest are said to be not far off.
A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Vol. II Robert Kerr

noun
a two- or three-masted sailing ship, esp one with a broad beam, high poop deck, and lateen rig that was used by the Spanish and Portuguese in the 15th and 16th centuries
n.

1520s, from Middle French caravelle (15c.), from Spanish carabela or Portuguese caravela, diminutive of caravo “small vessel,” from Late Latin carabus “small wicker boat covered with leather,” from Greek karabos, literally “beetle, lobster” (see scarab). Earlier form carvel (early 15c.) survives in carvel-built (adj.).

Tagged:

Read Also:

  • Carb

    a carburetor. carbohydrate. to eat large quantities of carbohydrates before a major physical exertion in order to store up energy (usually followed by up): Some marathon runners carb up on spaghetti the night before a race. variant of carbo- before a vowel: carbazole. Contemporary Examples This protein and carb combo will help with keep you […]

  • Carb-up

    carbohydrate. to eat large quantities of carbohydrates before a major physical exertion in order to store up energy (usually followed by up): Some marathon runners carb up on spaghetti the night before a race. noun short for carburettor short for carbohydrate n. 1942 as an abbreviation of carburetor; c.2000 as short for carbohydrate. noun Carbohydrate; […]



  • Carbs

    a carburetor. carbohydrate. to eat large quantities of carbohydrates before a major physical exertion in order to store up energy (usually followed by up): Some marathon runners carb up on spaghetti the night before a race. Contemporary Examples And then there are the effects of carbs on exercise and sport performance and adaptation. Carbs 101: […]

  • Carbachol

    a white or slightly yellow crystalline compound, C 6 H 15 ClN 2 O 2 , soluble in water and alcohol: used in ophthalmology.



Disclaimer: Caravel definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.