Carburettor



a device for mixing vaporized fuel with air to produce a combustible or explosive mixture, as for an internal-combustion engine.
Historical Examples

In starting an engine, the petrol tap is turned on, and some of the spirit allowed to run into the carburettor.
The Aeroplane Claude Grahame-White and Harry Harper

We just operate this geared fan, and force air through the carburettor.
The Great Airship. F. S. Brereton

You couldn’t expect fuel to reach the carburettor when she was standing on her head.
The Great Airship. F. S. Brereton

He tried an alteration in the carburettor mixture, but this did not remedy matters.
Cavalry of the Clouds Alan Bott

Bleriot, following, succeeded in covering one side of the triangular course, but then came down through grit in the carburettor.
A History of Aeronautics E. Charles Vivian

As the gasoline is sprayed into the carburettor a quantity of air is drawn in from the outside.
The Launch Boys’ Cruise in the Deerfoot Edward S. Ellis

It was fully dark before the difficulty 103 was remedied by a careful readjustment of the carburettor.
The Launch Boys’ Adventures in Northern Waters Edward S. Ellis

It was an hour’s task to dry the carburettor and the magneto and get the engine running.
Across America by Motor-cycle C. K. Shepherd

As regards carburation, an automatic air valve surrounds the throat of the carburettor, maintaining normal composition of mixture.
A History of Aeronautics E. Charles Vivian

Bleriot, turning out in the morning, made a landing in some such fashion as flooded the carburettor and caused it to catch fire.
A History of Aeronautics E. Charles Vivian

noun
a device used in petrol engines for atomizing the petrol, controlling its mixture with air, and regulating the intake of the air-petrol mixture into the engine Informal term carb Compare fuel injection
n.

device to enhance a gas flame, 1866, from carburet “compound of carbon and another substance” (1795, now displaced by carbide), also used as a verb, “to combine with carbon” (1802); from carb-, comb. form of carbon, + -uret, an archaic suffix formed from Modern Latin -uretum to parallel French words in -ure. Motor vehicle sense is from 1896.

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