Carcass



the dead body of an animal.
Slang. the body of a human being, whether living or dead.
the body of a slaughtered animal after removal of the offal.
anything from which life and power are gone:
The mining town, now a mere carcass, is a reminder of a past era.
an unfinished framework or skeleton, as of a house or ship.
the body of a furniture piece designed for storage, as a chest of drawers or wardrobe, without the drawers, doors, hardware, etc.
the inner body of a pneumatic tire, resisting by its tensile strength the pressure of the air within the tire, and protected by the tread and other parts.
to erect the framework for (a building, ship, etc.).
Contemporary Examples

Jeb next found himself as an advisor to Barclays, which had picked through the carcass of what was left of Lehman.
Bush, Christie, Romney: Who’ll Be the GOP Class Warrior? Lloyd Green December 14, 2014

Climategate just ensures the carcass isn’t going to be embalmed—it will rot for all to see.
‘Climate Change Is a Myth’ Benjamin Sarlin December 6, 2009

He then deposits the carcass back in the woods, where Mother Nature takes care of the cleanup.
How to Catch a Giant Python Catharine Skipp February 27, 2010

I like to get the soup going using the turkey bones and carcass.
Marcus Samuelsson Talks Thanksgiving: Glogg And Berbere-Spiced Turkey Katie Baker November 21, 2012

He could stuff it inside the carcass of a cow, a donkey, even a person.
The Real-Life Hurt Locker Bryan Curtis February 1, 2010

Historical Examples

In the course of miles of daily wandering the grizzly may occasionally come upon a wounded animal or a carcass.
The Grizzly Enos A. Mills

Where the carcass is the vultures are on deck, or words similar.
Cy Whittaker’s Place Joseph C. Lincoln

At any rate they hewed the former out with axes and removed the latter before tumbling the carcass into the grave.
The Ivory Child H. Rider Haggard

When the hare is caught the carcass should be given to the young hounds to tear in pieces.
The Sportsman Xenophon

He’s a mystery, done up in the carcass of a little, dried-up man, of a d—d uncertain age.
The Knickerbocker, Vol. 22, No. 5, November 1843 Various

noun
the dead body of an animal, esp one that has been slaughtered for food, with the head, limbs, and entrails removed
(informal) generally (facetious or derogatory) a person’s body
the skeleton or framework of a structure
the remains of anything when its life or vitality is gone; shell
n.

late 13c., from Anglo-French carcois, from or influenced by Old French charcois (Modern French carcasse) “trunk of a body, chest, carcass,” and Anglo-Latin carcosium “dead body,” all of uncertain origin. Not used of humans after c.1750, except contemptuously. Italian carcassa probably is a French loan word.

noun

A human body; one’s body, esp if heavy: set his carcass on the couch

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