Carcinoma



a malignant and invasive epithelial tumor that spreads by metastasis and often recurs after excision; cancer.
Contemporary Examples

Doctors now argue that too many diseases fall into the carcinoma diagnosis.
You Don’t Actually Have Cancer Randi Hutter Epstein July 30, 2013

Historical Examples

In men over fifty, the resemblance to carcinoma may be very close.
Manual of Surgery Volume Second: Extremities–Head–Neck. Sixth Edition. Alexander Miles

Cases of complete occlusion constitute the rule in carcinoma, and the very great exception in ulcer.
A System of Practical Medicine By American Authors, Vol. II Various

carcinoma and sarcoma sometimes grow from the muco-periosteum in the region of the ethmoid.
Manual of Surgery Volume Second: Extremities–Head–Neck. Sixth Edition. Alexander Miles

carcinoma of the intestines appears either as cylindrical-cell cancer, as scirrhus, or as gelatinous or colloid cancer.
A System of Practical Medicine By American Authors, Vol. II Various

carcinoma is by far the most common form of new growth met with in the tongue, and it is almost invariably a squamous epithelioma.
Manual of Surgery Volume Second: Extremities–Head–Neck. Sixth Edition. Alexander Miles

It is most often observed in the sigmoid flexure and ccum, as are the other forms of carcinoma.
A System of Practical Medicine By American Authors, Vol. II Various

Of the forms of carcinoma, cylinder-cell cancer is the most frequent.
A System of Practical Medicine By American Authors, Vol. II Various

Arterial or mixed bleeding occurs in carcinoma and in rodent ulcer, and also from the stumps of badly-occluded piles.
A System of Practical Medicine By American Authors, Vol. II Various

carcinoma probably furnishes a favorable medium for its growth.
A Manual of Clinical Diagnosis James Campbell Todd

noun (pathol) (pl) -mas, -mata (-mətə)
any malignant tumour derived from epithelial tissue
another name for cancer (sense 1)
n.

“malignant tumor,” 1721, from Latin carcinoma, from Greek karkinoma “a cancer,” from karkinos “cancer,” literally “crab” (see cancer) + -oma.

carcinoma car·ci·no·ma (kär’sə-nō’mə)
n. pl. car·ci·no·mas or car·ci·no·ma·ta (-mə-tə)

Abbr. CA An invasive malignant tumor derived from epithelial tissue that tends to metastasize to other areas of the body.
carcinoma
(kär’sə-nō’mə)
Plural carcinomas or carcinomata (kär’sə-nō’mə-tə)
Any of various cancerous tumors that are derived from epithelial tissue of the skin, blood vessels, or other organs and that tend to metastasize to other parts of the body. See also basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma.

carcinoma [(kahr-suh-noh-muh)]

A malignant tumor in the tissues that make up the skin, glands, mucous membranes, and lining of organs.

Tagged:

Read Also:

  • Carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma

    carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma n. A carcinoma developing in a benign mixed tumor of a salivary gland and characterized by rapid growth and pain.

  • Carcinoma in situ

    carcinoma in situ carcinoma in situ n. A neoplasm whose cells are localized in the epithelium and show no tendency to invade or metastasize to other tissues.



  • Carcinoma simplex

    carcinoma simplex carcinoma simplex carcinoma sim·plex (sĭm’plěks’) n. A carcinoma that is poorly differentiated or lacks differentiation.

  • Carcinomatosis

    a condition marked by the production of an overwhelming number of carcinomas throughout the body. noun (pathol) a condition characterized by widespread dissemination of carcinomas or by a carcinoma that affects a large area Also called carcinosis (ˌkɑːsɪˈnəʊsɪs) carcinomatosis car·ci·no·ma·to·sis (kär’sə-nō’mə-tō’sĭs) n. A pathological condition characterized by the presence of carcinomas that have metastasized to […]



Disclaimer: Carcinoma definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.