Carillon



a set of stationary bells hung in a tower and sounded by manual or pedal action, or by machinery.
a set of horizontal metal plates, struck by hammers, used in the modern orchestra.
Historical Examples

But to do that with the carillon was found to be inexpedient.
Scientific American Supplement, No. 384, May 12, 1883 Various

“You seemed to think differently at carillon not long ago,” he returned.
The World For Sale, Complete Gilbert Parker

His engagement to Miss carillon had not been an agreeable experience.
Robert Orange John Oliver Hobbes

It was broken only by the chiming of a carillon clock in the hall below.
The Testing of Diana Mallory Mrs. Humphry Ward

There we took coach, as the locks at carillon are not yet large enough for full-sized steamers to pass.
Lands of the Slave and the Free Henry A. Murray

She was safe; but now as her canoe shot onward to the town of carillon, her senses again grew faint.
The World For Sale, Complete Gilbert Parker

I have seen her three times of late, and the last time I saw her was an hour or so since, when she rode the Rapids of carillon.
The World For Sale, Complete Gilbert Parker

carillon, kar′il-yong, n. a suite of musical bells for playing tunes: the melody played on these.
Chambers’s Twentieth Century Dictionary (part 1 of 4: A-D) Various

The child went out of the place sadly, as the carillon rang.
Wisdom, Wit, and Pathos of Ouida Ouida

The French carried these guns off with them 285 to carillon, and they afterwards had a chequered history.
America, Volume IV (of 6) Joel Cook

noun (music)
a set of bells usually hung in a tower and played either by keys and pedals or mechanically
a tune played on such bells
an organ stop giving the effect of a bell
a form of celesta or keyboard glockenspiel
verb -lons, -lonning, -lonned
(intransitive) to play a carillon
n.

1775, from French carillon, which, according to French sources, is from Old French carignon “set of four bells,” an alteration of quarregon, from Vulgar Latin *quadrinionem, from Latin quaternionem “set of four,” from quater “four times,” from PIE *kwetrus, from root *kwetwer- “four” (see four).

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    Zoology. a keellike part or ridge, especially a ridge of bone on the ventral side of the sternum of birds. Botany. the two conjoined lower petals of a pea or bean flower that enclose the stamen and style. Historical Examples The basal margin on the carinal side of the spur is sometimes a little hollowed […]



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