the wheel of a cart.
an acrobatic feat in which a person starts from a standing position, with arms extended, and wheels the body sideways, landing first on the hands and then on the feet and usually repeating this in a series.
Slang. any large coin, especially a U.S. silver dollar.
Slang. an amphetamine tablet.
to roll forward end over end:
The skier took a sudden spill and cartwheeled down the slope.
Historical Examples

He was no more like the Chabert of the old box-coat than a cartwheel double sou is like a newly coined forty-franc piece.
Colonel Chabert Honore de Balzac

Say, you haven’t got a cartwheel instead of this wrapping paper, have you?
Free Air Sinclair Lewis

The brim of her cartwheel hat grated along his Derby, and they drew as close as fashion permitted.
The Gay Gnani of Gingalee Florence Huntley

Here has been cartwheel, your sweetheart; what will become of him?
The Recruiting Officer George Farquhar

Six feet o’ greaser gov’ner a-turnin’ a cartwheel in his own house!
Bring Me His Ears Clarence E. Mulford

He gave a shriek and dodged back, and a cartwheel shaved him narrowly.
The War of the Worlds H. G. Wells

Of course, there were plenty of cartwheel tracks; but they told nothing of interest to the troubled hardware dealer.
Carolyn of the Corners Ruth Belmore Endicott

Serious accident; a cartwheel passes over The Widow’s child.
Three Expeditions into the Interior of Eastern Australia, Vol 2 (of 2) Thomas Mitchell

Wine and beer we have in plenty in the cellar, and the cheese I shall cut is as a cartwheel for bigness.
Not Quite Eighteen Susan Coolidge

But it was the dad and her at home I thought of, and could put my neck below the cartwheel for distressing.
The Shoes of Fortune Neil Munro

the wheel of a cart, usually having wooden spokes and metal tyres
an acrobatic movement in which the body makes a sideways revolution supported on the hands with arms and legs outstretched
(US, slang) a large coin, esp the silver dollar

late 14c., “wheel of a cart,” from cart (n.) + wheel (n.). Meaning “lateral somersault” is recorded from 1861; as a verb from 1907. Related: Cartwheeled; cartwheeling.


A dollar, esp a silver dollar (1850+)


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