Carve-out



to cut (a solid material) so as to form something:
to carve a piece of pine.
to form from a solid material by cutting:
to carve a statue out of stone.
to cut into slices or pieces, as a roast of meat.
to decorate with designs or figures cut on the surface:
The top of the box was beautifully carved with figures of lions and unicorns.
to cut (a design, figures, etc.) on a surface:
Figures of lions and unicorns were carved on the top of the box.
to make or create for oneself (often followed by out):
He carved out a career in business.
to carve figures, designs, etc.
to cut meat.
Contemporary Examples

Republicans know these “carve-out” accounts are anathema to most Democrats and impossible with a Democratic president.
The Coming Democratic Split on Social Security Keith Hennessey August 18, 2010

The freedom to associate that Feldman mentions is one carve-out that courts have recognized.
Morally and Legally, the Right Call in Arizona Michael Tomasky February 26, 2014

verb
(transitive) to cut or chip in order to form something: to carve wood
to decorate or form (something) by cutting or chipping: to carve statues
to slice (meat) into pieces: to carve a turkey
noun

See carveout
v.

Old English ceorfan (class III strong verb; past tense cearf, past participle corfen) “to cut, cut down, slay; to carve, cut out, engrave,” from West Germanic *kerfan (cf. Old Frisian kerva, Middle Dutch and Dutch kerven, German kerben “to cut, notch”), from PIE root *gerbh- “to scratch,” making carve the English cognate of Greek graphein “to write,” originally “to scratch” on clay tablets with a stylus.

Once extensively used, most senses now usurped by cut (v.). Meaning specialized to sculpture, meat, etc., by 16c. Related: Carved; carving. Original strong conjugation has been abandoned, but archaic carven lingers.

verb

To give one a thrill; send: He carves me. Does he carve you? (1930s+ Jive talk)

The arts of engraving and carving were much practised among the Jews. They were practised in connection with the construction of the tabernacle and the temple (Ex. 31:2, 5; 35:33; 1 Kings 6:18, 35; Ps. 74:6), as well as in the ornamentation of the priestly dresses (Ex. 28:9-36; Zech. 3:9; 2 Chr. 2:7, 14). Isaiah (44:13-17) gives a minute description of the process of carving idols of wood.

Tagged:

Read Also:

  • Carve

    to cut (a solid material) so as to form something: to carve a piece of pine. to form from a solid material by cutting: to carve a statue out of stone. to cut into slices or pieces, as a roast of meat. to decorate with designs or figures cut on the surface: The top of […]

  • Carvacrol

    a colorless, thick, oily liquid, C 10 H 14 O, having a mintlike odor: used chiefly as a disinfectant, as a fungicide, and as a scent in the manufacture of perfume. Historical Examples carvacrol is an oily liquid, with a strong taste and unpleasant odor. Mrs. Hale’s Receipts for the Million Sarah Josepha Hale



  • Carry the banner

    carry the banner verb phrase To walk the street all night for lack of a bed: I have ”carried the banner” in infernal metropolises (1890s+ Hoboes)

  • Carry the difference

    carry the difference verb phrase To be armed: If you’re going to fool around with that guy, don’t you think you ought to carry the difference? (1900s+)



Disclaimer: Carve-out definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.