Casey at the bat



casey at the bat

A poem by Ernest Lawrence Thayer from the late nineteenth century about Casey, an arrogant, overconfident baseball player who brings his team down to defeat by refusing to swing at the first two balls pitched to him and then missing on the third. The poem’s final line is, “There is no joy in Mudville — mighty Casey has struck out.”

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  • Casey

    a male given name: from an Irish word meaning “brave.”. Anson [an-suh n] /ˈæn sən/ (Show IPA), 1798–1858, president of the Republic of Texas. Casey [key-see] /ˈkeɪ si/ (Show IPA), (John Luther Jones) 1864–1900, U.S. locomotive engineer: folk hero of ballads, stories, and plays. Chuck (Charles Martin Jones) 1912–2002, U.S. film animator. Daniel, 1881–1967, English […]

  • Cash

    money in the form of coins or banknotes, especially that issued by a government. money or an equivalent, as a check, paid at the time of making a purchase. to give or obtain cash for (a check, money order, etc.). Cards. to win (a trick) by leading an assured winner. to lead (an assured winner) […]



  • Cash-account

    an account in which all transactions are in money. Finance. an account in which purchases are paid for in full, as distinguished from purchasing on credit or margin.

  • Cash-and-carry

    sold for cash payment and no delivery service. operated on such a basis: a cash-and-carry business. Historical Examples In many of the cities and large towns, some credit grocers have adopted what is called the “cash-and-carry plan.” Woman’s Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 5 Woman’s Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences adjective, adverb sold or […]



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