Cask



a container made and shaped like a barrel, especially one larger and stronger, for holding liquids.
the quantity such a container holds:
wine at 32 guineas a cask.
to place or store in a cask.
Contemporary Examples

A bottle of The Glenlivet, aged in the cask longer than Poppet and Buster put together.
The Ridiculousness of Father’s Day P. J. O’Rourke June 14, 2014

Historical Examples

A cask or vessel to contain water is said to be wind-tight and water-tight.
The Sailor’s Word-Book William Henry Smyth

Then pour it into the cask, and in a few days it will be fine and clear.
Directions for Cookery, in its Various Branches Eliza Leslie

They were seated together on a cask, and Mr. Moggridge had possessed himself, for the twentieth time, of his companion’s hand.
The Astonishing History of Troy Town Sir Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

When cool, put it into a cask, and set it in a cool cellar till spring.
Directions for Cookery, in its Various Branches Eliza Leslie

The second cask was filled with fresh water, to replace that in the first when it should no longer be fit for the use of the fish.
Happy Days for Boys and Girls Various

Smashed by a cask of sugar, and six poor children—oh dear, dear, dear!’
The Life And Adventures Of Nicholas Nickleby Charles Dickens

And another said, ‘Truly, there is a cask ready for the meat;’ and he pointed to the tower.
Claret and Olives, from the Garonne to the Rhone Angus B. Reach

At once the brushes disappeared and the cask began to fill itself with money.
The Chinese Fairy Book Various

The Protestants, who were the majority of the inhabitants, had abandoned it, leaving not a wisp of straw nor a cask of liquor.
The History of England from the Accession of James II. Thomas Babington Macaulay

noun
a strong wooden barrel used mainly to hold alcoholic drink: a wine cask
any barrel
the quantity contained in a cask
(Austral) a lightweight cardboard container with plastic lining and a small tap, used to hold and serve wine
(engineering) another name for flask (sense 6)
n.

mid-15c., from Middle French casque “cask; helmet,” from Spanish casco “skull, cask, helmet,” originally “potsherd,” from cascar “to break up,” from Vulgar Latin *quassicare, frequentative of Latin quassare “to shake, shatter” (see quash). The sense evolution is unclear.

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