Cataplasm



poultice.
Historical Examples

A plaster or cataplasm, with opium and camphor on the region of the stomach, will sometimes revert its retrograde motions.
Zoonomia, Vol. II Erasmus Darwin

And he jotted it down in his note-book, near the prices of Dare Devil and cataplasm.
The Bill-Toppers Andre Castaigne

This cataplasm is also highly commended by some in the Gout.
Every Day Life in the Massachusetts Bay Colony George Francis Dow

Make a cataplasm of bean meal and salad oil, and lay it to the place afflicted.
The Works of Aristotle the Famous Philosopher Anonymous

Curumilla, after having washed the wounds with clean cold water, applied a cataplasm to them of bruised oregano leaves.
The Adventurers Gustave Aimard

A cataplasm applied in inflammations, Anthony’s fire, &c., represses them.
Notes and Queries, Number 193, July 9, 1853 Various

On the next day, the inflammation had greatly subsided; the cataplasm and lotion were continued.
An Essay on the Application of the Lunar Caustic in the Cure of Certain Wounds and Ulcers John Higginbottom

A cataplasm of the juice, with rye meal, is good against luxations and ruptures.
Notes and Queries, Number 193, July 9, 1853 Various

noun
(med) another name for poultice

cataplasm cat·a·plasm (kāt’ə-plāz’əm)
n.
See poultice.

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