Catechu



any of several astringent substances obtained from various tropical plants, especially from the wood of two East Indian acacias, Acacia catechu and A. suma: used in medicine, dyeing, tanning, etc.
Historical Examples

The extract is an efficient substitute for catechu and kino.
Cooley’s Practical Receipts, Volume II Arnold Cooley

For other dyes cotton has a special attraction, such as catechu.
Vegetable Dyes Ethel M. Mairet

A strong decoction of catechu; the shade may be varied by the cautious addition of a little weak solution of bichromate of potash.
Cooley’s Cyclopdia of Practical Receipts and Collateral Information in the Arts, Manufactures, Professions, and Trades…, Sixth Edition, Volume I Arnold Cooley

With some dyes a separate bath is needed, such as with Camwood or catechu.
Vegetable Dyes Ethel M. Mairet

Cotton is usually dyed by boiling it for about one hour in a decoction of catechu (100%) containing copper sulphate (5%).
Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 8, Slice 8 Various

catechu and Betelleaf are chewed for this purpose by the natives of the East.
The Action of Medicines in the System Frederick William Headland

The fruit, when tender, is masticated like the Areca catechu.
The Philippine Islands John Foreman

catechu, or terra japonica, in powder or solution, is also sometimes added to give a roughness to the spirit.
Cooley’s Cyclopdia of Practical Receipts and Collateral Information in the Arts, Manufactures, Professions, and Trades…, Sixth Edition, Volume I Arnold Cooley

Turmeric, orchil, catechu, and indigo carmine are all extremely fugitive.
Scientific American Supplement, No. 810, July 11, 1891 Various

The syrup of krameria is the least objectionable, and catechu and krameria are made into troches which are sometimes available.
A System of Practical Medicine By American Authors, Vol. II Various

noun
a water-soluble astringent resinous substance obtained from any of certain tropical plants, esp the leguminous tree Acacia catechu of S Asia, and used in medicine, tanning, and dyeing See also gambier

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