Ceding



to yield or formally surrender to another:
to cede territory.
Contemporary Examples

Historical Examples

verb
when intr, often foll by to. to transfer, make over, or surrender (something, esp territory or legal rights): the lands were ceded by treaty
(transitive) to allow or concede (a point in an argument, etc)
v.

1630s, from French céder or directly from Latin cedere “to yield, give place; to give up some right or property,” originally “to go from, proceed, leave,” from Proto-Italic *kesd-o- “to go away, avoid,” from PIE root *ked- “to go, yield” (cf. Sanskrit sedhati “to drive; chase away;” Avestan apa-had- “turn aside, step aside;” Greek hodos “way,” hodites “wanderer, wayfarer;” Old Church Slavonic chodu “a walking, going,” choditi “to go”). Related: Ceded; ceding. The sense evolution in Latin is via the notion of “to go away, withdraw, give ground.”

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