Chuck



[chuhk] /tʃʌk/

verb (used with object)
1.
to toss; throw with a quick motion, usually a short distance.
2.
Informal. to resign from; relinquish; give up:
He’s chucked his job.
3.
to pat or tap lightly, as under the chin.
4.
Informal. to eject (a person) from a public place (often followed by out):
They chucked him from the bar.
5.
Slang. to vomit; .
noun
6.
a light pat or tap, as under the chin.
7.
a toss or pitch; a short throw.
8.
a sudden jerk or change in direction.
Idioms
9.
chuck it, British Slang. stop it; shut up.
[chuhk] /tʃʌk/
noun
1.
the cut of beef between the neck and the shoulder blade.
2.
a block or log used as a chock.
3.
Machinery.

verb (used with object)
4.
Machinery. to hold or secure with a chuck.
[chuhk] /tʃʌk/
verb (used with or without object)
1.
to cluck.
noun
2.
a clucking sound.
3.
Archaic. (used as a term of endearment):
my love, my chuck.
[chuhk] /tʃʌk/
noun, Western U.S. Slang.
1.
food; provisions.
[chuhk] /tʃʌk/
noun, Informal.
1.
.
[chuhk] /tʃʌk/
noun, Canadian Slang.
1.
.
2.
any body of .
[chuhk] /tʃʌk/
noun
1.
a male given name, form of .
2.
Older Slang: Usually Disparaging and Offensive.

[yey-ger] /ˈyeɪ gər/
noun
1.
Charles (Elwood) (“Chuck”) born 1923, U.S. aviator and test pilot: the first person to fly faster than the speed of sound (1947).
[ber-ee; for 2 also French be-ree] /ˈbɛr i; for 2 also French bɛˈri/
noun
1.
Charles Edward Anderson (“Chuck”) born 1926, U.S. rock-‘n’-roll singer, musician, and composer.
2.
Also, Berri. a former province in central France.
/tʃʌk/
verb (mainly transitive)
1.
(informal) to throw
2.
to pat affectionately, esp under the chin
3.
(informal) sometimes foll by in or up. to give up; reject: he chucked up his job, she chucked her boyfriend
4.
(slang, mainly US) (intransitive) usually foll by up. to vomit
5.
(Austral & NZ, informal) chuck off at, to abuse or make fun of
noun
6.
a throw or toss
7.
a playful pat under the chin
8.
(informal) the chuck, dismissal
/tʃʌk/
noun
1.
Also called chuck steak. a cut of beef extending from the neck to the shoulder blade
2.

/tʃʌk/
verb
1.
(intransitive) a less common word for cluck (sense 2)
noun
2.
a clucking sound
3.
a term of endearment
/tʃʌk/
noun (Canadian W coast)
1.
a large body of water
2.
short for saltchuck
/ˈbɛrɪ/
noun (pl) -ries
1.
any of various small edible fruits such as the blackberry and strawberry
2.
(botany) an indehiscent fruit with two or more seeds and a fleshy pericarp, such as the grape or gooseberry
3.
any of various seeds or dried kernels, such as a coffee bean
4.
the egg of a lobster, crayfish, or similar animal
verb (intransitive) -ries, -rying, -ried
5.
to bear or produce berries
6.
to gather or look for berries
noun
1.
(ˈbɛrɪ). Chuck, full name Charles Edward Berry. born 1926, US rock-and-roll guitarist, singer, and songwriter. His frequently covered songs include “Maybellene” (1955), “Roll Over Beethoven” (1956), “Johnny B. Goode” (1958), “Memphis, Tennessee” (1959), and “Promised Land” (1964)
2.
(French) (bɛri). Jean de France (ʒɑ̃ də frɑ̃s), Duc de. 1340–1416, French prince, son of King John II; coregent (1380–88) for Charles VI and a famous patron of the arts
v.

“to throw,” 1590s, variant of chock “give a blow under the chin” (1580s), possibly from French choquer “to shock, strike against,” imitative (see shock (n.1)). Related: Chucked; chucking.
n.

“piece of wood or meat,” 1670s, probably a variant of chock (n.) “block.” “Chock and chuck appear to have been originally variants of the same word, which are now somewhat differentiated.” Specifically of shoulder meat from early 18c. American English chuck wagon (1880) is from the meat sense.

“slight blow under the chin,” 1610s, from chuck (v.1). Meaning “a toss, a throw” is from 1862. Related: Chucked; chucking.
n.

Old English berie, from Proto-Germanic *basjom (cf. Old Norse ber, Middle Dutch bere, German Beere “berry;” Old Saxon winber, Gothic weinabasi “grape”), of unknown origin. This and apple are the only native fruit names.
berry
(běr’ē)

Our Living Language : Cucumbers and tomatoes aren’t usually thought of as berries, but to a botanist they are in fact berries, while strawberries and raspberries are not. In botany, a berry is a fleshy kind of simple fruit consisting of a single ovary that has multiple seeds. Other true berries besides cucumbers and tomatoes are bananas, oranges, grapes, and blueberries. Many fruits that are popularly called berries have a different structure and thus are not true berries. For example, strawberries and raspberries are aggregate fruits, developed from multiple ovaries of a single flower. The mulberry is not a true berry either. It is a multiple fruit, like the pineapple, and is made up of the ovaries of several individual flowers.

noun

verb

noun

A dollar

[1900s+; perhaps fr the notion of a small unit of something good, and alliterating with buck; see the berries]

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  • Chucked

    [chuhk] /tʃʌk/ verb (used with object) 1. to toss; throw with a quick motion, usually a short distance. 2. Informal. to resign from; relinquish; give up: He’s chucked his job. 3. to pat or tap lightly, as under the chin. 4. Informal. to eject (a person) from a public place (often followed by out): They […]



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