Collect



[kuh-lekt] /kəˈlɛkt/

verb (used with object)
1.
to gather together; assemble:
The professor collected the students’ exams.
2.
to accumulate; make a of:
to collect stamps.
3.
to receive or compel payment of:
to collect a bill.
4.
to regain control of (oneself or one’s thoughts, faculties, composure, or the like):
At the news of her promotion, she took a few minutes to collect herself.
5.
to call for and take with one:
He drove off to collect his guests. They collected their mail.
6.
Manège. to bring (a horse) into a attitude.
7.
Archaic. to infer.
verb (used without object)
8.
to gather together; assemble:
The students collected in the assembly hall.
9.
to accumulate:
Rain water collected in the barrel.
10.
to receive payment (often followed by on):
He collected on the damage to his house.
11.
to gather or bring together books, stamps, coins, etc., usually as a hobby:
He’s been collecting for years.
12.
Manège. (of a horse) to come into a attitude.
adjective, adverb
13.
requiring payment by the recipient:
a collect telephone call; a telegram sent collect.
[kol-ekt] /ˈkɒl ɛkt/
noun
1.
any of certain brief prayers used in Western churches especially before the epistle in the communion service.
/kəˈlɛkt/
verb
1.
to gather together or be gathered together
2.
to accumulate (stamps, books, etc) as a hobby or for study
3.
(transitive) to call for or receive payment of (taxes, dues, etc)
4.
(transitive) to regain control of (oneself, one’s emotions, etc) as after a shock or surprise: he collected his wits
5.
(transitive) to fetch; pick up: collect your own post, he collected the children after school
6.
(slang) (intransitive) sometimes foll by on. to receive large sums of money, as from an investment: he really collected when the will was read
7.
(transitive) (Austral & NZ, informal) to collide with; be hit by
8.
collect on delivery, the US term for cash on delivery
adverb, adjective
9.
(US) (of telephone calls) on a reverse-charge basis
noun
10.
(Austral, informal) a winning bet
/ˈkɒlɛkt/
noun
1.
(Christianity) a short Church prayer generally preceding the lesson or epistle in Communion and other services
v.

early 15c. (transitive), from Old French collecter “to collect” (late 14c.), from Latin collectus, past participle of colligere “gather together,” from com- “together” (see com-) + legere “to gather” (see lecture (n.)). The intransitive sense is attested from 1794. Related: Collected; collecting. As an adjective meaning “paid by the recipient” it is attested from 1893, originally with reference to telegrams.

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  • Collectable

    [kuh-lek-tuh-buh l] /kəˈlɛk tə bəl/ adjective 1. capable of being . noun 2. an object suitable for a , originally a work of fine art or an antique, now including also any of a wide variety of items as a hobby, for display, or as an investment whose value may appreciate. /kəˈlɛktəbəl/ adjective 1. (of […]

  • Collectables

    [kuh-lek-tuh-buh l] /kəˈlɛk tə bəl/ adjective 1. capable of being . noun 2. an object suitable for a , originally a work of fine art or an antique, now including also any of a wide variety of items as a hobby, for display, or as an investment whose value may appreciate. adj. also collectable, 1650s, […]



  • Collectanea

    [kol-ek-tey-nee-uh] /ˌkɒl ɛkˈteɪ ni ə/ plural noun 1. collected passages, especially as arranged in a miscellany or anthology. /ˌkɒlɛkˈteɪnɪə/ plural noun 1. a collection of excerpts from one or more authors; miscellany; anthology

  • Collect-call

    noun 1. a long-distance telephone call that is to be paid for by the person or station receiving it.



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