Common



[kom-uh n] /ˈkɒm ən/

adjective, commoner, commonest.
1.
belonging equally to, or shared alike by, two or more or all in question:
common property; common interests.
2.
pertaining or belonging equally to an entire community, nation, or culture; public:
a common language or history; a common water-supply system.
3.
joint; united:
a common defense.
4.
widespread; general; ordinary:
common knowledge.
5.
of frequent occurrence; usual; familiar:
a common event; a common mistake.
6.
hackneyed; trite.
7.
of mediocre or inferior quality; mean; low:
a rough-textured suit of the most common fabric.
8.
coarse; vulgar:
common manners.
9.
lacking rank, station, distinction, etc.; unexceptional; ordinary:
a common soldier; common people; the common man; a common thief.
10.
Dialect. friendly; sociable; unaffected.
11.
Anatomy. forming or formed by two or more parts or branches:
the common carotid arteries.
12.
Prosody. (of a syllable) able to be considered as either long or short.
13.
Grammar.

14.
Mathematics. bearing a similar relation to two or more entities.
15.
of, relating to, or being common stock:
common shares.
noun
16.
Often, commons. Chiefly New England. a tract of land owned or used jointly by the residents of a community, usually a central square or park in a city or town.
17.
Law. the right or liberty, in common with other persons, to take profit from the land or waters of another, as by pasturing animals on another’s land (common of pasturage) or fishing in another’s waters (common of piscary)
18.
commons, (used with a singular or plural verb)

19.
commons.

20.
(sometimes initial capital letter) Ecclesiastical.

21.
Obsolete.

Idioms
22.
in common, in joint possession or use; shared equally:
They have a love of adventure in common.
/ˈkɒmən/
adjective
1.
belonging to or shared by two or more people: common property
2.
belonging to or shared by members of one or more nations or communities; public: a common culture
3.
of ordinary standard; average: common decency
4.
prevailing; widespread: common opinion
5.
widely known or frequently encountered; ordinary: a common brand of soap
6.
widely known and notorious: a common nuisance
7.
(derogatory) considered by the speaker to be low-class, vulgar, or coarse: a common accent
8.
(prenominal) having no special distinction, rank, or status: the common man
9.
(maths)

10.
(prosody) (of a syllable) able to be long or short, or (in nonquantitative verse) stressed or unstressed
11.
(grammar) (in certain languages) denoting or belonging to a gender of nouns, esp one that includes both masculine and feminine referents: Latin sacerdos is common
12.
(anatomy)

13.
(Christianity) of or relating to the common of the Mass or divine office
14.
(informal) common or garden, ordinary; unexceptional
noun
15.
(sometimes pl) a tract of open public land, esp one now used as a recreation area
16.
(law) the right to go onto someone else’s property and remove natural products, as by pasturing cattle or fishing (esp in the phrase right of common)
17.
(Christianity)

18.
(archaic) the ordinary people; the public, esp those undistinguished by rank or title
19.
in common, mutually held or used with another or others
adj.

c.1300, “belonging to all, general,” from Old French comun “common, general, free, open, public” (9c., Modern French commun), from Latin communis “in common, public, shared by all or many; general, not specific; familiar, not pretentious,” from PIE *ko-moin-i- “held in common,” compound adjective formed from *ko- “together” + *moi-n-, suffixed form of root *mei- “change, exchange” (see mutable), hence literally “shared by all.”

Second element of the compound also is the source of Latin munia “duties, public duties, functions,” those related to munia “office.” Perhaps reinforced in Old French by the Germanic form of PIE *ko-moin-i- (cf. Old English gemæne “common, public, general, universal;” see mean (adj.)), which came to French via Frankish.

Used disparagingly of women and criminals since c.1300. Common pleas is 13c., from Anglo-French communs plets, hearing civil actions by one subject against another as opposed to pleas of the crown. Common prayer is contrasted with private prayer. Common stock is attested from 1888.
n.

late 15c., “land held in common,” from common (adj.). Commons “the third estate of the English people as represented in Parliament,” is from late 14c. Latin communis also served as a noun meaning “common property, state, commonwealth.”

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